Skip to content Skip to navigation

The Art of the Scan

May 1, 2009
by Stacey Kramer
| Reprints

My appointment is one month from tomorrow. That’s the date I’ll be seeing my specialist in Boston (I live in New York). But unlike the past eight years that I’ve gone to see him, this time I’m not taking my art portfolio case from college. This time, should I fly, I don’t have to ask the flight attendant to store the case in the oversized compartment up front. This time, I don’t need to take my MRI films with me. This time, I’m going digital. In fact, the CD of my brain, is already in the hands of my doctor, and he can already peek at my head should he wish to, even before I get there. What this means, is that he can consult with my local specialist to discuss me and what protocol they think fits best. In fact, he already has. What this translates to for me is better communication and better care. That said, apart from the speed, efficiency, patient safety, and all the other benefits of HIT, it can also save the patient a lot of hassle. Of course, it also comes with the fact that I’ll no longer get Delta employees asking what’s in the case, and no longer have the opportunity to say, ‘my brain.’

Topics

Comments

There is a massive divide between those that get it and those that don't. The ones that don't are the ones who (in my experience) are less aggressive and not up on the latest data. They are far less sharp and to me, far less credible.

it's wonderful to see that there is some progress. do you see a great divide between those that "get" IT and those that don't among your doctors?

stacey

Stacey Kramer is Managing Editor of Healthcare Informatics. She writes feature stories and...