Skip to content Skip to navigation

AHIMA: Hospitals Lag on ICD-10 Readiness

June 3, 2013
by Rajiv Leventhal
| Reprints

Most of the nation’s 4,000-plus hospitals have only just begun ICD-10 implementation efforts, according to analysis by the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA), which was published in the June edition of the Journal of AHIMA.

That concerning conclusion was also reached this past fall, when Springfield, Mo.-based consulting vendor TrustHCS and AHIMA conducted a comprehensive survey of ICD-10 readiness through a professional survey firm, who interviewed more than 300 health information management (HIM) professionals representing 293 healthcare facilities that included academic medical centers, teaching and non-teaching community hospitals, and critical access hospitals. Eighty-four percent of the survey participants were HIM directors.

According to the survey, more than 50 percent were still in the beginning phases of ICD-10 migration in fall of 2012. A total of 25 percent had not even formed an ICD-10 steering committee, one of the first steps of implementation. Project plans were underway for only 17 percent of facilities, leaving the vast majority of providers with no plans, no budgets, and very little progress to report.

The exception to this procrastination was teaching community hospitals and academic medical centers, where 30 percent of HIM respondents in those types of facilities said they regularly meet with steering committees and have their ICD-10 transition projects underway. Critical access hospitals were identified as the slowest participants in the ICD-10 race, likely due to their exemption from DRG-based reimbursement.

While 72 percent of hospitals surveyed have already begun ICD-10 education, of the hospitals without an ICD-10 steering committee, nearly half have not started education initiatives. Budgets for ICD-10 training are higher within groups who have already established committees and have transition projects underway. The researchers behind the study believe this finding indicates that deeper and more extensive ICD-10 education is certainly required by many providers. AHIMA and the federal government predicted 50 hours of ICD-10 training would be needed for each full time coder to successfully transition to ICD-10.

“The move to ICD-10 is a long assembly line requiring a monumental amount of teamwork and coordination,” said the authors of the AHIMA analysis, Torrey Barnhouse and William Rudman, Ph.D., RHIA. “More than ever, communication and planning are the key factors to a successful transition. And once organizational buy-in is achieved, rapid action with quarterly auditing of progress is a must.”

Topics

News

Lenovo Health and Orbita Launch Voice-Enabled Home Health Assistant Technology

North Carolina-based health IT company Lenovo Health and Orbita, a Boston-based connected home healthcare company, launched a virtual home care solution and showcased the technology at HIMSS17 in Orlando.

Phase 2 Winners Chosen in ‘Move Health Data Forward’ Challenge

The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology has announced five winners in Phase 2 of the “Move Health Data Forward” Challenge, a contest to develop solutions to help with the flow of health information.

National Association for Trusted Exchange Unveils FHIR-Based Solution for Data Sharing

At the HIMSS17 conference in Orlando on Monday, The National Association for Trusted Exchange (NATE) unveiled NATE’s Blue Button Directory (NBBD) and is demonstrating it as part of the Federal Health Architecture’s demonstrations in the HIMSS17 Interoperability Showcase.

Health Catalyst Incorporates Regenstrief’s NLP Solution in Its Analytics Platform

At the HIMSS17 conference in Orlando, the nonprofit Regenstrief Institute announced a partnership with analytics vendor Health Catalyst involving Regenstrief's artificial intelligence-powered text analytics technology.

Survey: Cybersecurity Getting More Attention at the C-Suite and Board Level

Cybersecurity has been elevated to a central concern for healthcare providers, with more attention at the board level and the C-suite, according to a new survey by Orem, Utah-based KLAS Research and the College of Healthcare Information Management Executives (CHIME). The study found that 42 percent of organizations have a vice president or C-level official in charge of cybersecurity and for 39 percent of organizations, the head of cybersecurity is at the director level.

Partnership for Health IT Patient Safety Focuses on Patient Identification

The Partnership for Health IT Patient Safety has rolled out its second set of Safe Practice Recommendations with a focus on reducing patient misidentification.