Skip to content Skip to navigation

Mount Sinai to Test, Monitor Patients’ Genomic Information through EHR

August 1, 2013
by Gabriel Perna
| Reprints

The New York City-based, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the Institute for Family Health have received a $3.7 million grant from the government for a personalized medicine initiative that will allow providers to test and monitor patients’ genomic information through their electronic health record (EHR).

The providers will use the patients' genomic information at the point-of-care to individualize treatment, testing and monitoring. Linking genomic information with the EHR has become Mount Sinai’s calling card in 2013. In May, it announced 25,000 people signed on to participate in its biobank program, BioMe, where each patient has broadly consented to DNA sequencing, contact from researchers, and longitudinal studies related to data embedded in the electronic medical record (EMR). 

Along with monitoring through the EHR, the latest genomic initiative allows providers to use Clipmerge, which is a clinical-decision support engine for delivering guidelines with genetic variants of clinical significance to enhance treatment. Clipmerge was the basis for another pilot announced back in April.

The program, Sinai says, is the first ever genetic testing in a primary care setting to identify genetic risk for kidney disease in patients with hypertension. It’s aimed at Africa American patients, which according to Sinai research have a one-in-eight chance of a gene that makes them greater risk for developing chronic kidney disease or end-stage kidney disease if they have hypertension, or high blood pressure.

"We believe that with genomic information made available to doctors through a patient's electronic health record, we will be able to achieve better and stricter control of blood pressure and targeted use of medications that inhibit the renin angiotensin system, which are recommended in hypertensive patients at risk for kidney disease. More comprehensive tracking will also help ensure that optimal tests will be performed to stop progression of kidney disease,” stated Erwin Bottinger, M.D., Director of the Charles Bronfman Institute of Personalized Medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and one of two principal investigators of the grant.

The program will begin with a cluster-randomized controlled trial that will be conducted at 12 primary care sites in New York, including practices at Mount Sinai and the Institute for Family Health, which operates an independent network of community health centers in Manhattan and the Bronx.

Mount Sinai is part of a larger trend where more and more providers are linking genomic information to the EHR.

Topics

News

Lenovo Health and Orbita Launch Voice-Enabled Home Health Assistant Technology

North Carolina-based health IT company Lenovo Health and Orbita, a Boston-based connected home healthcare company, launched a virtual home care solution and showcased the technology at HIMSS17 in Orlando.

Phase 2 Winners Chosen in ‘Move Health Data Forward’ Challenge

The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology has announced five winners in Phase 2 of the “Move Health Data Forward” Challenge, a contest to develop solutions to help with the flow of health information.

National Association for Trusted Exchange Unveils FHIR-Based Solution for Data Sharing

At the HIMSS17 conference in Orlando on Monday, The National Association for Trusted Exchange (NATE) unveiled NATE’s Blue Button Directory (NBBD) and is demonstrating it as part of the Federal Health Architecture’s demonstrations in the HIMSS17 Interoperability Showcase.

Health Catalyst Incorporates Regenstrief’s NLP Solution in Its Analytics Platform

At the HIMSS17 conference in Orlando, the nonprofit Regenstrief Institute announced a partnership with analytics vendor Health Catalyst involving Regenstrief's artificial intelligence-powered text analytics technology.

Survey: Cybersecurity Getting More Attention at the C-Suite and Board Level

Cybersecurity has been elevated to a central concern for healthcare providers, with more attention at the board level and the C-suite, according to a new survey by Orem, Utah-based KLAS Research and the College of Healthcare Information Management Executives (CHIME). The study found that 42 percent of organizations have a vice president or C-level official in charge of cybersecurity and for 39 percent of organizations, the head of cybersecurity is at the director level.

Partnership for Health IT Patient Safety Focuses on Patient Identification

The Partnership for Health IT Patient Safety has rolled out its second set of Safe Practice Recommendations with a focus on reducing patient misidentification.