Skip to content Skip to navigation

Policy Committee Supports ‘Deeming’ Approach to Stage 3 MU

April 3, 2013
by David Raths
| Reprints

Members of the Health IT Policy Committee were largely supportive of work being done by the meaningful use work group to lighten the reporting burden of Stage 3 of meaningful use.

At the April 3 Policy Committee meeting, Paul Tang, M.D., vice chair of the committee, outlined the work in progress. He said at this inflexion point, ONC must take into account progress and momentum in health IT usage as it thinks about stage 3. “So the thinking is we are recognizing the benefits, let’s back off on the reporting cost of doing so,” Tang said. “It has been a forced march, and that has meant fewer resources available for vendors and providers to innovate and address local priorities.”

Policy Committee member Christine Bechtel, vice president of the National Partnership for Women & Families,described ongoing efforts to consolidate MU objectives to reduce the total number of things you have to report on. “We want to eliminate the “check-the-box” things that should be de facto ways people use HIT.” The consolidation subgroup started with all 43 objectives originally proposed for Stage 3 and consolidated them to 25. All the criteria still would be included in EHR certification requirements, so the features would be available without regulators micro-managing their use. An example is recording structured lab results. That requirement is really already included in the criteria around creating care summaries and view, download and transmit data.

Tang then described how the meaningful use work group is considering “deeming” that some high performers or those showing significant improvement on clinical quality measures meet MU requirements. “You cannot be a good performer on these measures without effective use of health IT,” he said. “If you demonstrate you are doing well by patients, we will let up in terms of requirements to promote innovation and reduce the burden.”

Tang acknowledged that there might not be enough outcome measures in some specialty areas for those providers to deem, but those clinicians can still use the original pathway to MU, he said.

“We are trying to reward good behavior, reduce the burden and let the market pull people along.”

The committee’ s response was positive, with several members saying the plan has the potential to increase flexibility while making the MU program less burdensome.



OSU Wexner Medical Center Receives AHIMA Grace Award

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center (OSUWMC) received the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) annual Grace Award in recognition of its leadership in health information management.

Kansas Health Information Network Expands its Network across State Lines

The Kansas Health Information Network (KHIN) has announced that it is expanding its horizons, and is now connected to Health Information Exchange Texas (HIETexas).

CMS Selects Vendor to Modernize Critical Identity Infrastructure

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) last week announced it had selected San Francisco-based vendor Okta to enhance the security of its information systems.

Mayo Clinic, ASU Partner for Medical Education, Healthcare Innovation

The Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University have announced a partnership centered on transforming medical education and healthcare in the U.S. through a variety of innovation efforts.

CMS Hospital Compare Website Updated with VA Data

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has announced the inclusion of Veterans Administration (VA) hospital performance data as part of the federal agency’s Hospital Compare website.

CMS Awards Funding to Special Innovation Projects

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has awarded 20, two-year Special Innovation Projects (SIPs) aimed at local efforts to deliver better care at lower cost.