Study: Tablets Can Effectively Read EEG Results

April 2, 2013
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According to a study done by Mayo Clinic physicians in Arizona, electroencephalogram or EEG results can effectively be evaluated through tablet computers. The neurologists at Mayo Clinic in Arizona, who presented their findings at the American Academy of Neurology conference in San Diego, say that being able to read EEG results from anywhere will help patients in the long run.

The researchers were looking to see if an EEG, which is a procedure that uses electrodes attached to a person's scalp to detect electrical activity in the brain, could be interpreted through a tablet, instead of a traditional laptop. Not only could it analyze the results, the researchers say it weighed less, had a faster boot-up time, and had a comparable screen resolution. However, they did note the screen size was smaller.

"With high volumes of EEGs and multiple systems and facilities to read from, the efficiency of technology is essential to many physician practices," Matthew Hoerth, M.D., a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona, said in a statement. "Despite the marginally smaller screen size, the ease of use, accessibility, and reliability make the tablet a viable option for its integration into the tele-EEG practice.

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