Skip to content Skip to navigation

Study: Use of e-Prescribing Reduces Diabetes-Related Adverse Drug Events

March 8, 2017
by Heather Landi
| Reprints

According to research published in Medical Care, the use of electronic prescriptions with diabetes patients is associated with a lower risk of emergency department visits or hospitalizations for diabetes-related adverse drug events.

According to the study, although the adoption of e-prescriptions among physicians has increased substantially under the Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act and Meaningful Use programs, little is known of its impact on patient outcomes. For the study, which was funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), researchers examined the impact of e-prescribing on emergency visits or hospitalizations for diabetes-related adverse drug events, including hypoglycemia.

The researchers studied 3.1 million Medicare fee for service, Part D enrolled beneficiaries over age 66 with diabetes mellitus and at least 90 days of antidiabetic medications. In order to examine the impact of e-prescribing, researchers focused on measuring e-prescribing as the percentage of all prescriptions a person received transmitted to the pharmacy electronically. The outcome measure was the occurrence of an emergency department (ED) visit or hospitalization for hypoglycemia or diabetes-related adverse drug events.

The study results indicated that diabetes patients with more than 75 percent of their medications prescribed electronically had 21 adverse drug events per 1,000 Medicare Part D beneficiaries. “Beneficiaries with lower e-prescribing levels had significantly higher numbers of adverse drug events,” the study authors wrote. “We found a robust association between the greater use of electronic prescriptions in the outpatient setting and the lower risk of an inpatient or ED visit for an adverse drug among Medicare beneficiaries with diabetes in our adjusted analysis. At the e-prescribing threshold of 75 percent and above, significant reductions in adverse drug event risk can be seen.”

As an observational study, the results show an association but do not prove causation, nevertheless, the study authors concluded that the use of e-prescribing is associated with lower risk of an ED visit or hospitalization for diabetes-related drug errors.

 

Get the latest information on Meaningful Use and attend other valuable sessions at this two-day Summit providing healthcare leaders with educational content, insightful debate and dialogue on the future of healthcare and technology.

Learn More

Topics

News

House Republicans, Short of Votes, Withdraw the American Health Care Act

House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wisconsin) called off a scheduled vote in the House of Representatives Friday on Republicans’ embattled healthcare bill, the American Health Care Act (ACHA), as a growing number of Republicans opposed the bill, Ryan announced during a press conference at 4 pm Friday.

Trump Administration Appoints Peter Severino to Head Office for Civil Rights

Roger Severino, a former staffer at The Heritage Foundation, has been appointed as the director of the Office of Civil Rights (OCR) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

ACP: EHRs Have Great Benefits, but Raise Ethical Questions, Too

Electronic health records (EHRs) should facilitate high value patient-centered care, strong patient-physician relationships, and effective training of future physicians, but they also raise ethical questions, the ACP wrote.

Allegheny Health Network, VA Pittsburgh Integrate EMR Systems

Allegheny Health Network (AHN), based in Pittsburgh, and VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System (VAPHS), have announced the successful integration of their electronic medical record (EMR) platforms.

Wisconsin Urology Group Notifies Patients of Data Breach Due to Ransomware Attack

Wauwatosa, Wis.-based Metropolitan Urology Group has notified its patients of a breach of unsecured patient health information due to a ransomware attack back in November 2016.

Study: For Post-Op Patients, Mobile Apps for Follow-Up Care Led to Fewer In-Person Visits

For patients undergoing ambulatory surgery, those who used a mobile app for follow-up care attended fewer in-person visits post- operation than patients who did not use the app, according to a study in JAMA Surgery.