Skip to content Skip to navigation

Survey: Docs Going Mobile to Access Patient Data

July 23, 2015
by Rajiv Leventhal
| Reprints

More than half of ambulatory practice physicians currently access patient records and/or reference data from a mobile device, according to a new survey from Black Book Market Research.

What’s more, the survey, which included more than 320 complex medical software firms employing either virtualized or native electronic health record (EHR) applications, revealed that 70 percent of all clinicians indicated they aim to use mobile EHR devices and software by the end of 2015.

Additionally, 31 percent of all physicians responding utilize smart phones as part of their individual patient management strategies, the survey found. Emergency physicians, radiologists, OB/gyn, general surgeons and orthopedic surgeons were among the specialists with the highest utilization of iPhones and/or android phones as part of their daily patient management routine.

As such, as thousands of physician practices are still selecting their first mobile records systems, and other physicians are exchanging out original EHR choices, current mobile EHR adopters identify the firms that deliver on implementation success, reimbursement improvements, physician productivity, outcomes, usability and interoperability.

"As the transition to mobile devices has been rapidly occurring over the past five years, progressive EHR vendors have responded with clear plans and successful products to help expand the user experience," Doug Brown, managing partner of Black Book Market Research, said in a statement. "With more than half of physicians currently using a mobile device in their medical practices, these EHR vendors are allowing providers to choose which platform best fits in to their workflow in multiple healthcare delivery settings including highly usable mobile products."

Further, based on the aggregate client experience and customer satisfaction scores on eighteen key performance indicators, the top-ranked virtualized and mobile electronic health records application vendor for 2015 is drchrono. This is the third consecutive year drchrono has ranked first among physician practices in mobile EHR in Black Book client surveys. Other top performing mobile EHR application firms in the 2015 Black Book Market Research 2015 user poll include: HealthFusion, Greenway, Cerner, Allscripts, athenahealth, PracticeFusion, iPatientCare, Kareo, and ADP AdvancedMD.



EHNAC and HITRUST Combine HIPAA Security Criteria, CSF Framework

The Electronic Healthcare Network Accreditation Commission (EHNAC) and the Health Information Trust Alliance (HITRUST) announced plans to streamline their accreditation and certification programs.

Halamka on MACRA Final Rule: “CMS is Listening and I Thank Them”

Health IT notable expert John Halamka, M.D., CIO of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, recently weighed in on the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA) final rule.

Texas Patient Care Clinic Hit with Ransomware Attack

Grand Prairie, Texas-based Rainbow Children's Clinic was the victim of a ransomware attack on its IT systems in August, affecting more than 33,000 patients, according to multiple news media reports this week.

Healthcare Organizations Again Go to Bat for AHRQ

Healthcare organizations are once again urging U.S. Senate and House leaders to protect the Department of Health and Human Services’ Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) from more budget cuts for 2017.

ONC Pilot Projects Focus on Using, Sharing Patient-Generated Health Data

Accenture Federal Services (AFS) has announced two pilot demonstrations with the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) to determine how patient-generated health data can be used by care teams and researchers.

Is it Unethical to Identify Patients as “Frequent Flyers” in Health IT Systems?

Several researchers from the University of Pennsylvania addressed the ethics of behavioral health IT as it relates to “frequent flyer” icons and the potential for implicit bias in an article published in JAMA.