Skip to content Skip to navigation

Survey: Physician Compensation Evolving Thanks to Nonclinical Demands

April 25, 2012
by Gabriel Perna
| Reprints

As physicians’ role changes in the evolving healthcare landscape, their added complex administrative roles has been increasingly reflective in their compensation according to a recent study from the Medical Group Management Association (MGMA). The study, Medical Directorship and On-Call Compensation Survey: 2012 Report Based on 2011 Data,” provides benchmark information that is reflective of the primary compensation drivers for directorship activities.

Generally the report found that the more complex the nonclinical roles, the higher amount of money the physician received in a stipend. Those with responsibilities for community relations or strategic development reported a higher median annualized stipend ($25,000) than their peers who were responsible for other nonclinical, directorship duties, according to the report. Surgical specialty directors responsible for documentation and care planning, monitoring quality and appropriateness of medical care, or physician relations and/or representation reported an annualized stipend of $36,000. Nonsurgical subspecialists with provider of last resort/call availability or regulation, licensure, and credentialing responsibilities earned a higher median annualized stipend ($44,586) than their peers with other duties.

According to the report, time spent on nonclinical directorship activities varies greatly. The majority of respondents to this survey reported that their duties were only a component of total work time. Almost 50 percent indicated they spent fewer than six hours per week on directorship activities. As such, benchmark data reflected stipend amounts for non-clinical effort.

Because of the increasing focus on quality initiatives, the survey began asking this year’s participants to report total annualized stipend amounts by quality metrics tied to their directorships. Those in Pulmonary medicine indicated an 80 percent difference in annualized stipend based on whether or not quality metrics were tied to their duties.  

“It appears that reimbursement for medical practices will be more closely tied to quality metrics in the future, so the medical director’s most important duty will likely be that of the 'quality monitor,'” Jeffrey W. Smith, CEO of Pottstown (Pa.) Medical Specialists Inc, said in a statement. “As practices enhance the way they gather data through their electronic health records and practice management systems, the medical director, along with practice administrators, can review data tied to their quality metrics and be instrumental in monitoring the practice’s efforts, which could ultimately improve care and reduce costs.”

The MGMA "Medical Directorship and On-Call Compensation Survey: 2012 Report Based on 2011 Data" is the most robust and comprehensive report of its kind, containing data on 1,399 medical directors in 266 medical organizations.

Topics

News

CMS Extends Deadline for eCQM Data Submission

CMS is extending the deadline for eligible hospitals in the Hospital Inpatient Quality Reporting (IQR) and Meaningful Use programs to submit their electronic clinical quality measure (eCQM) data from 2016.

NorthShore Revalidated by HIMSS Analytics as Stage 7 Worthy

Due to its continued use of IT to improve patient care and reduce costs, Chicago-based NorthShore University HealthSystem has received Stage 7 revalidation on HIMSS’ acute care EMRAM and outpatient EMRAM for its hospitals and associated clinics.

Cybersecurity Consulting Firm CynergisTek Acquired by Auxilio

Austin, Tex.-based cybersecurity and privacy consulting firm CynergisTek has been acquired by Auxilio, Inc., a provider of document workflow solutions and IT security services based in Mission Viejo, California, in a deal valued at up to $34.3 million.

Healthcare Data Breaches: A Year in Review

The latest year-in-review Breach Barometer report from Protenus paints a stark picture—2016 average at least one health data breach per day, affecting more than 27 million patient records.

Healthcare Industry Could Save $9.4B with Full Adoption of Electronic Transactions

The healthcare industry continues to make modest progress toward full adoption of electronic business transactions, but significant gaps remain, representing an opportunity for $9.4 billion in savings, according to new data from the 2016 CAQH Index.

ONC Announces Phase 2 Winners of Consumer, Provider App Challenges

ONC today announced the Phase 2 winners for the Consumer Health Data Aggregator Challenge and the Provider User Experience Challenge.