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Text Message Medicine: SMS Texts from the ED Can Reduce Binge Drinking

July 11, 2014
by John DeGaspari
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Text message approaches could be integrated into current routine screening and may be applicable to other risk behaviors

Young adults who screened positive for a history of hazardous or binge drinking reduced their binge drinking by more than 50 percent after receiving mobile phone text messages following a visit to the emergency department, according to a study published online in Annals of Emergency Medicine.

Researchers enrolled 765 young adult emergency patients with a history of hazardous drinking in the study. For 12 weeks, one-third received short service message (SMS) texts prompting them to respond to drinking-related queries and received text messages in return offering feedback on their answers. The feedback was tailored to strengthen their low-risk drinking plan or goal or to promote reflection on either their drinking plan or their decision not to set a low-risk goal. One-third received only text message queries about their drinking and one-third received no text messages.

The group receiving both text message queries and feedback decreased their self-reported binge drinking days by 51 percent and decreased the number of self-reported drinks per day by 31 percent. The groups that received only text messages or no text messages increased the number of binge drinking days.

“Each day in the U.S., more than 50,000 adults ages 18 to 24 visit ERs and up to half have hazardous alcohol use patterns,” said Brian Suffoletto, M.D., of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, in a prepared statement.  “More than a third of them report alcohol abuse or dependence. The emergency department provides a unique setting to screen young adults for drinking problems and to engage with them via their preferred mode of communication to reduce future use.”




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