PCCI Combines Predictive Modeling, Patient Engagement to Address Pediatric Asthma | Healthcare Informatics Magazine | Health IT | Information Technology Skip to content Skip to navigation

PCCI Combines Predictive Modeling, Patient Engagement to Address Pediatric Asthma

August 16, 2018
by David Raths
| Reprints
Over three years, effort leads to 31 percent drop in ED visits and 42 percent drop in admissions for pediatric asthma cohort
Steve Miff

The Parkland Center for Clinical Innovation (PCCI) in Dallas has spent the past three years developing and testing predictive models to identify children at risk for asthma exacerbations. Combining those models with clinical and population health interventions has led to improved outcomes, says PCCI, which is now turning its efforts to pre-term births.

This targeted population health effort was funded by Parkland Community Health Plan, the largest Medicaid plan in the Dallas area. PCCI has eight clinicians on staff, including two pediatricians by training. “They intuitively knew that for the population we are serving pediatric asthma is typically not well managed and is a high-cost condition,” said Steve Miff, president and CEO of PCCI.

A deep-dive analysis of the data for the health plan identified areas that had the largest expenditures and where there was the most variation in care and potential overutilization for services, such as emergency room visits for asthma, he said.

“We had to understand the disease itself and where these children receive care in the community.”

PCCI has built a predictive model to risk-stratify the children into different cohorts based on the likelihood that their asthma condition would exasperate over the next three months and likely require emergency department visits or hospitalizations. The model itself uses claims data, EHR data, social determinants of health information, which might include gaps in insurance coverage. “We also ingested and used data from EPA sensors in the community about air quality,” Miff said. That has been only marginally useful so far because the sensors are not specific enough to be able to attribute to an individual,” he said, “so we are working with local universities and some companies that are deploying sensors to get data on air quality that is more real-time and more specific.”

Part of the project involves being more proactive with clinicians and patients.  It sends alerts to the 21 physician practices involved before visits with these patients. Because the payer is involved, the case manager at the health plan gets a risk-stratified list of patients. The risk manager use that to focus on the very high-risk cohort, Miff said.

“We also engage directly with the children and families themselves in their home,” he said. “We enroll the very high-risk cohort into a texting program.” They receive texts multiple times per week with reminders about upcoming appointments, reminders about the need to take their medication, and ongoing education about their condition so it stays top of mind. “What is cool is that they 70 percent rated it very useful in a survey, and over a 12-month period, we saw only 15 percent attrition, which is pretty fantastic when you think about the frequency of engagements.”

Miff said that over the last three years, this has proven to be an effective way to engage individuals. “We have expanded the number of clinics and individuals involved and we have continued to refine the model.

He pointed to some key improvements: The program is saving the health plan around $6 million per year in costs for this population. “Contributing to that is that we have seen a 31 percent drop in ED visits and we have seen a 42 percent drop in in-patient admissions for the population,” he said.  Alerts embedded in clinicians’ EHRs and monthly progress reports have led to up to 50 percent improvement in asthma controller medication prescriptions and a 5 percent improvement in the asthma medication ratio.

PCCI also did a cross-market analysis to compare apples to apples with other Medicaid insurers. The overall Dallas-Fort Worth Medicaid managed care market saw ED visits decline 5 percent over the past three years in a similar population. The overall market is making progress, Miff said, but a similar cohort within Parkland Community Health Plan had a 31 percent drop.

PCCI also found that the children most actively engaged with texting had even better outcomes in terms of reduced ED utilizations.

PCCI did have a cohort of high-risk children they could not get engaged via the texting program. They designed a pilot to use Amazon Echo Alexa as a personal assistant and a group interaction to gamify this process for those individuals. The Echo is programmed to ask questions about their asthma. The children win together as a group if they participate on a regular basis and their knowledge about their condition improves. “The results are not in on that pilot in terms of how long they stay engaged,” Miff said, “but it is an interesting way to engage them in the home.”

Looking at other cohorts that are costly, have high utilization and are not favorable for patients, they chose pre-term birth as a next target. “Nine months ago, we launched a pilot to look at that population,” Miff said, “and we are rolling out a subgroup of that population looking at gestational diabetes using a similar approach and model.”

“For the sub-cohort on gestational diabetes, we need additional information if we are going to engage with them at home. It is not enough to build these models based on the most recent clinical or claims data or social determinants,” Miff said. “We need more real-time information about their condition, so we have included remote monitoring devices to extract real-time data about three things: blood pressure, blood glucose and weight so we can monitor those.” PCI is designing the predictive models that take those into account. For the general diabetic population, they are focusing on the diabetic foot ulcer population.

PCCI’s impressive results with predictive modeling and patient outreach have drawn interest from other Medicaid plans.

“We are at a point where this is ready to be tested in other environments,” Miff said. “We are in advanced discussions with two other Medicaid plans in other parts of the country, and in advanced discussions with one commercial payer with an employer population to test these models. They will have to figure out to adjust the predictive models and the work flows and the in-home outreach from a technology perspective.”

 


The Health IT Summits gather 250+ healthcare leaders in cities across the U.S. to present important new insights, collaborate on ideas, and to have a little fun - Find a Summit Near You!


/article/patient-engagement/pcci-combines-predictive-modeling-patient-engagement-address-pediatric
/article/patient-engagement/ny-hospital-conducts-digital-assessments-patient-interactions

N.Y. Hospital Conducts Digital Assessments of Patient Interactions

November 13, 2018
by David Raths, Contributing Editor
| Reprints
Upstate University Hospital uses Vocera Rounds mobile app to gather data, provide feedback
Click To View Gallery

Physicians at Upstate University Hospital in Syracuse, N.Y., are using a mobile app to collect data about hospitalists’ behaviors during patient interactions in order to provide real-time feedback.

Amit Dhamoon, M.D., Ph.D., internist at Upstate University Hospital and associate professor of medicine at SUNY Upstate Medical University, said he was looking for a way to improve physician-patient communications.

“It is still unclear why some physicians really connect with patients and some just are not able to,” he said. “It is unclear why certain patients trust certain doctors more than others. We want to look at some basic behaviors.”

His team decided to do the digital assessment using a customized version of Vocera Rounds, a mobile application that enables clinicians to collaborate in responding to patient feedback and closing care gaps. “We needed a way to collect the data, relay it, and analyze it,” he said.

Fourth-year medical students who are going into internal medicine join the team of hospitalists on their rounds and serve as “silent shoppers,” Dhamoon said. They focus on the communication aspects of each interaction, and enter their observations into an iPad.  Residents and physicians also use the app to conduct a brief patient survey after the encounter. 

Among other things, they assess:

• how much time the provider was in the room;
• whether the provider introduced themselves;
• whether they sat down at eye level with patient; and
• At the end of conversation, did they ask if there were any questions?

Dhamoon said patients may pick up on body language or other things that physicians are not even cognizant of. “We are focusing on how to treat gall bladder disease or make their pneumonia better. We are focusing on the medicine,” he said. “We have to do that, but we also have to communicate what we are thinking.”

In an academic medical center, it is not unusual for teams of eight to nine doctors, residents and students enter a patient’s room. “Sometimes they don’t know what to do with their hands, so they stand with their arms crossed in front of them,” Dhamoon said. “For the patient, who is lying down with an ailment, it can almost feel like an inquisition.”

Dhamoon says hospital rooms are sometimes cramped and there is not a chair available. “I can say that it should be the gold standard that we are at eye level, so it doesn’t send a message to the patient that we have one foot out the door. But if we don’t have the basic tools in place, like a chair, then it is not going to work.”

Dhamoon and his colleagues are studying the effectiveness of this training approach and its impact on patient satisfaction measured by Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) surveys.  “My colleagues are incredible people. I want our patients to see how incredible they are. We get in our own way sometimes.”

 

 


More From Healthcare Informatics

/news-item/patient-engagement/getwellnetwork-acquires-healthloop

GetWellNetwork Acquires HealthLoop

November 9, 2018
by David Raths, Contributing Editor
| Reprints
Company seeks to provide comprehensive digital patient and family engagement platform

GetWellNetwork, a Bethesda, Md.-based company offering a platform for improving patient engagement, has acquired Silicon Valley startup HealthLoop.

The acquisition expands 280-employee GetWellNetwork’s reach into nearly 700 healthcare providers. Mountain View-Calif.-based HealthLoop’s platform enables care teams to engage patients before and after admission through automated, daily check-ins. Customers include Advocate Aurora Health, UCSF Health and LifeBridge

GetWellNetwork said it is combining its nearly two decades of experience implementing patient engagement solutions with 30-employee HealthLoop’s expertise in mobile technologies and digital care management. The move is designed to catalyze growth in the ambulatory space and signals its plans for more investment in cross-continuum tools to connect patients, families and providers.

GetWellNetwork was named one of Healthcare Informatics’ “Up and Comer” companies back in 2014. In an interview then, CEO Michael O’Neil described how the company uses the TV set in a hospital room to enhance patient engagement. To deal with pain management, GetWellNetwork has a workflow called the pain assessment pathway. If a patient is on a morphine pill, the system interrupts the TV show every hour to ask the patient to rate their pain on a scale. "If I report a certain threshold or below, it is simply going to document that in Epic, Cerner or Allscripts," O'Neil said. "If I report a five or above, it will document but also, through a Vocera badge, signal a nurse to go to the room. That is one pathway we help deploy, where pain management is a service or quality metric that a particular organization is trying to move the needle on. We are working with healthcare systems with the courage to take the 'patient-centered mission' off the poster in their office and bring it to the point of care."

In a prepared statement about the most recent acquisition, O’Neil said:  “Adding HealthLoop to our portfolio advances our strategy to provide the most comprehensive, end-to-end digital patient and family engagement platform. The changing nature of the how and where care is delivered requires dynamic solutions to meet modern engagement challenges. With HealthLoop as part of the GetWell portfolio, we’re excited to help health care organizations rethink and accelerate their digital strategies.”

 

 

 

Related Insights For: Patient Engagement

/blogs/david-raths/patient-engagement/dr-mark-smith-s-five-tasks-healthcare-sector

Dr. Mark Smith’s Five Tasks for the Healthcare Sector

| Reprints
Founding CEO of California Health Care Foundation challenges industry to allow laypeople to do some tasks now done by professionals
Click To View Gallery

A good keynote address gets us to challenge our assumptions and consider some new possibilities in our field, often bringing in ideas from other disciplines or markets. That is what Mark Smith, M.D., M.B.A. founding president and CEO of the California Health Care Foundation, did last week at the annual meeting of the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) in Washington, D.C.

Dr. Smith is a professor of clinical medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, and a visiting professor at the University of California, Berkeley. As a clinician, served on the front line of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in San Francisco. From 1996 to 2013, he led the California Health Care Foundation, where he helped build the organization into a leader in delivery system innovation, public reporting of care quality, and applications of new technology in healthcare. In his PCORI talk he laid out five tasks for the field, which I will paraphrase here:

1. Continue to work with providers and patients to develop robust clinically specific measures of quality.

2. Accelerate the integration and automation of quality measures into the work flow of care delivery as opposed to separate flow of funds, personnel and work.

3. Develop instruments to measure and improve self-care capability and work with industry on enabling technology that would allow laypeople to do tasks now done by professionals.

4. Think about non-creepy ways to use social media, search, shopping and other non-health data to inform care of patients.

5. Develop, promote and deploy nimble, adaptive research methodologies.

I want to touch on a few of these in detail because I think he made interesting points, some of which are counter-intuitive or go against the grain of current thinking. For instance, Task No. 1 involves quality measures, and Smith acknowledged that there are legitimate complaints from clinicians about the terrible burden in our current system of measurement. “But the answer to that is not a search for five magic measures” useful in all settings, he said. Smith added that the call for fewer measures is a false path.

The current measures are imprecise and often not compelling to patients and professionals, he stressed. The key is to develop measures that are relevant to patients and clinically significant. “We have all sorts of things important to hospitals, doctors and CFOs and CMOs,” he said. “We are just now learning how to create robust measures that are important to patients. I believe those will only be compelling to patients and their doctors if they are clinically specific. When I hear people say we need fewer, better measures, I say no, we need more better measures.”

Smith went into a few reasons why measurement is so challenging in healthcare. “Our IT systems are so primitive that the burden of collection, analysis, and reporting is substantial,” he said. “The answer is more clinically specific measures with greater integration into workflow.” In no other sector of the economy, he pointed out, are the systems for monitoring the quality of the process different from the established and funded system to do the process itself. “We have to Integrate the process of measuring quality and collecting information from patients with the view toward the ergonomic and economic integration into the work flow,” he said.

Smith turned to the concept of patient engagement, noting that everyone has a different definition. “In the early part of 21st century, patients should be engaged in the co-production of healthcare services. It is an extreme notion, but I have been known for being extreme sometimes,” he said.

In fact, Smith focused a good deal of his talk on the idea of co-production. He pointed to the fact that other industries have taken advantage of technology to allow customers to co-produce a service. For instance, people book their own travel now instead of using a travel agent; they use an ATM or bank online instead of getting money from a teller. “Those industries have economic incentive to involve us in the transaction that used to be one way from the professional to us,” he said.

Smith stressed healthcare could do more of that, citing examples such as patients in Great Britain taking their own blood pressure and managing hypertension with medications based on the results. Or patients being trained to test coagulation. Some patient cohorts are doing self-dialysis.

“We have a system that does not take advantage of modern IT,” he added, “because our payment system is based on early 20th century notion of healthcare and how it should be delivered. The only way the practitioner gets paid is if you go somewhere to get information.”

Health systems are starting to move toward involving patients in scheduling decision making, and reporting outcomes. The Open Notes movement is a big improvement in the co-production of information about patient health, but clearly Smith is envisioning more revolutionary changes.

Perhaps the most controversial topic he touched on was No. 4, finding non-creepy ways to use social media, search, shopping and other non-health data to inform care of patients. He asked the audience to imagine clinicians having access to what Google Amazon, and Facebook know about you. “I know that is creepy,” he stressed. “I get there are privacy concerns. We need to think of non-creepy ways to do it. Social media is like nuclear energy,” he added. “It can be used for good or ill. We need to try to integrate that profound deep knowledge about you into the management of your care.”

How you respond to that suggestion may reflect in part which generation you come from. Personally, I recoil from the idea of my primary care doctor reviewing my social media streams or my shopping bill from Whole Foods. But Smith said the search is for a non-creepy way to do that, so I will withhold judgement until I hear an idea that doesn’t sound creepy or Big Brother-ish to me.

But overall, Smith left the PCORI audience with a lot of ideas to consider, and he applauded PCORI researchers for “trying to figure out what is important to patients and get the right instruments to measure it.”

PCORI, he said, “is on the cutting edge of the most important thing we can do: spend time and effort and money on things that are important to patients rather than to professionals. We are just at the beginning of that process.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

See more on Patient Engagement

betebettipobetngsbahis bahis siteleringsbahis