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BREAKING: The 2018 Healthcare Informatics 100 is Now Open for Submissions

February 14, 2018
by the Editors of Healthcare Informatics
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Is your company one of the 100 leading healthcare information technology companies?

The Healthcare Informatics 100 is back up, and open for submissions. Once again, Healthcare Informatics will rank the top vendors with the highest revenues derived from healthcare IT products and services earned in the U.S. based on revenue information from the previous year.

This year’s version will be the 27th version of the list, which provides a unique financial overview of vendors active in the healthcare IT market. For the most part, corporate revenues are self-reported. As it has every year, however, the team of editors at Healthcare Informatics will be working with external consultants to ensure the most complete and comprehensive compendium possible.

In recent years, Healthcare Informatics added some elements to make the list an even better information resource for its readers. One major change was that on top of including provider-based revenue that companies have historically listed, vendors are now also able to include health IT revenue derived in the payer, health information management, employer, and vendor-to-vendor markets as well.

The same will hold true for this year’s version. On last year’s list, Eden Prairie, Minn.-based Optum once again held the top spot on the list with a U.S. health IT revenue of $7.3 billion. That number is the highest ever for a Healthcare Informatics 100 vendor, and it was the third year in a row that Optum took the top spot.

The entire 2017 list can be read right here.

What's more, also for the third straight year, we are asking each vendor to estimate the percentage of revenue earned in all of their product segments. As seen on the form, there are seven product categories, from which Healthcare Informatics compiles breakout lists based on the percentage of revenue earned in each segment.  

"We believe that the Healthcare Informatics 100 offers a distinctive service to our industry, and is uniquely referenced by professionals throughout the field every year," says Mark Hagland, Editor-in-Chief of Healthcare Informatics.

The Healthcare Informatics 100 will be published in late May. The deadline to submit is May 14, 2018. You can submit your company’s data right here.


2018 Raleigh Health IT Summit

Renowned leaders in U.S. and North American healthcare gather throughout the year to present important information and share insights at the Healthcare Informatics Health IT Summits.

September 27 - 28, 2018 | Raleigh


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In the past few years, numerous audits and investigations have turned up millions in:

► provider overpayments
► incorrect reimbursements
► lost money

Taken together, the costs of delayed, pended, or error-ridden claims add up quickly—and the amounts are staggering.

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MGMA: Physician Compensation Data Illustrates Nationwide PCP Shortage

May 23, 2018
by Rajiv Leventhal
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Primary care physicians’ compensation rose by more than 10 percent over the past five years, representing an increase which is nearly double that of specialty physicians’ compensation over the same period, according to the Medical Group Management Association (MGMA).

Officials from the Colorado-based MGMA, attested that the data “is further evidence of the worsening primary care physician shortage in the American healthcare system.”

A closer look at this data—the 2018 MGMA DataDive Provider Compensation—shows that this rise in compensation is not necessarily tied to an increase in productivity. When broken down by primary care focus, family medicine physicians saw a 12-percent rise in total compensation over the past five years, while their median number of work relative value units (wRVUs) remained flat, increasing by less than one percent. Practices offered more benefits to attract and retain physicians, including higher signing bonuses, continuing medical education stipends, and relocation expense reimbursements.

The data for this survey was based on comparative data from more than 136,000 providers in over 5,800 organizations.

“MGMA’s latest survey has put strong data behind a concerning trend we’ve seen in the American healthcare system for some time—we are experiencing a real shortage of primary care physicians,” Halee Fischer-Wright, M.D., president and CEO at MGMA, said in a statement. “Many factors contribute to this problem, chief among them being an increasingly aging population that’s outpacing the supply of chronic care they require. And with a nearly two-fold rise in median compensation for primary care physicians over their specialist counterparts and increased additional incentives, we can now see the premium organizations are placing on primary care physicians’ skills to combat this shortage.” 

Further supporting this trend, the new survey identified meaningful growth in compensation for non-physician providers over the past 10 years. Nurse practitioners saw the largest increase over this period with almost 30 percent growth in total compensation. Primary care physician assistants saw the second-largest median rise in total compensation with a 25 percent increase.

The research also revealed that over the past five years, rises in median compensation varied greatly by state. In two states, median total compensation actually decreased for primary care physicians: Alabama (-9 percent) and New York (-3 percent). Many states saw much larger increases in median total compensation compared to the national rate, the top five being Wyoming (41 percent), Maryland (29 percent), Louisiana (27 percent), Missouri (24 percent) and Mississippi (21 percent).

Related Insights For: Revenue Cycle Management

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Survey: Healthcare Orgs with Multiple RCM Systems Have More Challenges with Denials

May 15, 2018
by Heather Landi
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More than two-thirds of health systems (about 70 percent) use more than one vendor for revenue cycle management, and those organizations that do use more than one solution report larger issues with denials, a recent survey found.

For the survey, Dimensional Insight, an analytics and data management solutions company, collaborated with HIMSS Analytics to poll 117 senior-level decision makers in hospitals and health systems, including CEOs, CIOs, directors of IT and finance and heads of revenue cycle management. The survey examines the state of revenue cycle management, and highlights the difficulty in integrating data, and the impact it is having on revenue collection.

The survey found that more than two-thirds (70.9 percent) of hospitals use their EMR solutions for revenue cycle management. In addition, most hospitals utilize multiple vendors for RCM purposes. This is true of hospitals that leverage their EMR for RCM and those that use other solutions.

The survey also revealed relatively low levels of analytics-based automation in RCM, with 36 percent of hospitals say less than a quarter of their revenue cycle process is automated using analytics. Another 24 percent report that 51 to 75 percent of their RCM process is automated.

As healthcare delivery continues to evolve, hospitals are struggling to make the most of their revenues. The shift to value-based care, increased patient pay, and a flurry of mergers are creating new challenges within the financial ecosystems of health systems. Many organizations are looking for ways to improve their revenue cycle management.

According to the survey respondents, denials continue to be the biggest RCM challenge for health systems today, cited by 76 percent of respondents. Healthcare senior executives also identified revenue integrity (37 percent) and patient pay (34 percent) as top RCM challenges.

Organizations using more than one vendor mostly report bigger issues with denials than those using one RCM solution. Close to 70 percent of health systems using three or more vendor solutions report that denials are their biggest challenge, with only 63 percent of health systems using one vendor solution said denials topped the list of challenges within revenue cycle management. The highest rates of problems with denials (100 percent) were reported by health systems using their EMR plus one or two other solutions.

What’s more, nearly all respondents (98 percent) say collecting data from disparate sources is a challenge for revenue reimbursement. Of them, 65 percent said it was moderately challenging, while 33 percent said it is extremely challenging. The survey also asked health systems which areas within the revenue cycle posed the biggest challenges for collecting data. Performance tracking (27 percent), inability to identify billing errors (25 percent), and keeping up with variances (24 percent) were the top three responses, with another 14 percent citing difficulty monitoring trends.

And, 96 percent of health systems say the way data is collected is a challenge, with 58 percent calling it a moderate issue and 37 percent citing it as a big issue.

The survey drilled down into how disparate data sources can contribute to issues with revenue integrity. About two-thirds of healthcare senior executives cited “lack of interoperability” as an ongoing issue, and the same percentage cited “some systems are left in silos” as an issue that impacts revenue integrity. Another 30 percent of respondents cited another issue—“key stakeholders do not trust the data.”

The survey also examined organizations’ RCM governance processes. A majority of hospitals of all sizes reported that their RCM governance is centralized. Overall, 69 percent of hospitals have centralized RCM governance, with the highest percentage (73 percent) among hospitals with more than 500 beds and the lowest (50 percent) among hospitals with 50 – 100 beds. Overall, 16 percent report having no RCM governance process. The bigger the hospital, the less likely it had no RCM governance in place

The report authors concluded that health systems are struggling with interoperability, and the associated challenges have effects throughout the enterprise. “The survey revealed a patchwork of solutions, an arrangement that does not seem to be working particularly well. In addition to highlighting the challenge of collecting and integrating data from disparate sources, the survey shows a real financial impact. Lack of interoperability does not just affect clinical and operational decisions. It is hurting the bottom line. Health systems need solutions to bring data together and make it useful throughout the entire revenue cycle,” the report states.

 “Many hospitals and health systems are undergoing mergers in hopes of increasing efficiencies. Or they implement several different technologies as band-aids to compensate for the deficiencies of systems,” Fred Powers, president and CEO of Dimensional Insight, said in a statement. “Unfortunately, what they’re finding in many cases is that the different technology systems in place are hard to integrate, and now this is impacting the bottom line.”

 

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