For Doctors Without Borders, Telemedicine Brings Specialized Care to the Front Lines | Heather Landi | Healthcare Blogs Skip to content Skip to navigation

For Doctors Without Borders, Telemedicine Brings Specialized Care to the Front Lines

December 22, 2017
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More broadly, Lawrence says his field work with Doctors Without Borders has been an eye-opening experience and has raised his awareness of the critical healthcare needs throughout much of the world.

“It’s been the most rewarding and most valuable part of my surgical medical career. From a patient perspective, the needs that exist for so much of the population of the world are not well addressed. In terms of how I view healthcare globally, I think it should be a basic human right, but it’s still largely a privilege. And, of course, there’s discrepancies in healthcare inside the U.S. as well, but it’s so different in the context that we work in,” he says.

Continuing he says, “Our focus is often in areas of conflict; a little over half of our projects are near or adjacent to conflict zones, so that instability often leads to deterioration of healthcare systems overall, systems that may or may not have been functioning in a pretty good state previous to the conflict or violence.” And, he adds, “From a surgical side, there is a gross maldistribution in terms of where surgical care is offered—the richest third of the population wind up getting 75 percent of the operative procedures, and the poorest third of the population only get about 3 percent of the operations. This is a void that I think we help to fill and I think what this organization offers in that regard is very valuable.”

As another takeaway, Lawrence says he has been impressed with the efficiency of the operating rooms of the Doctors Without Borders field hospitals. “They are the most efficient that I’ve ever been in. People in the U.S. are shocked to hear me say that, but there is so much more you can get done in a day there, than is possible here.”

Speaking with Lawrence about his experiences working in the field in areas like South Sudan and Syria, it brings to mind that while the U.S. healthcare system is in the midst of accelerating change and uncertainty—federal policy changes, possible cuts to Medicare, the ongoing transition from volume-based reimbursement to value-based care and payment, rapidly rising healthcare costs—there is much to appreciate and applaud about the U.S. healthcare system and the progress the industry is making to increase quality of care. And, healthcare professionals in the U.S. should perhaps appreciate that even with limited budgets they are operating with more financial resources and working in safer, more stable environments compared to many of their physician colleagues located in conflict areas throughout the world.

Moving ahead in 2018, technology and digital innovation will continue to play a large role in ongoing efforts to meet the “Triple Aim,” providing high-quality care and improving the health of populations at lower cost. And as healthcare IT leaders focus on leading-edge and next-generation technologies—whether artificial intelligence, machine learning, virtual reality, robotics and advanced analytics—it’s worth recognizing the benefits of more fundamental technologies, such as telemedicine, as highlighted by the work that Lawrence and other physicians are doing in their humanitarian and medical relief efforts around the world.

 

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