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Netsmart, InterSystems Team Up for Better Insights into Behavioral Health Data

February 10, 2017
by Rajiv Leventhal
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Netsmart, an Overland Park, Ks.-based provider that focuses on connecting behavioral health and post-acute care, has selected the InterSystems (Cambridge, Mass.) data platform with the aim to give behavioral health professionals better insights on patient data.

The InterSystems data platform includes embedded analytics, which officials say aims to “unleash knowledge trapped in electronic health records (EHRs).” Meanwhile, the myAvatar CareRecord EHR and practice management solution from Netsmart was created specifically for the behavioral health industry and allows providers to connect with the rest of healthcare.

InterSystems has worked closely with Netsmart and Mental Health Center of Denver (MHCD), known for its innovative approach to mental health treatment and high-quality patient care delivery, to develop these new capabilities within the Netsmart solution. Previously, MHCD had developed a set of assessments to measure mental health recovery from both the patient’s and clinician’s perspectives. Patients evaluate their progress regularly in a brief assessment, which physicians then analyze to track progress toward recovery on several key dimensions.

Netsmart solutions aim to enable a clinician-friendly view of the rich and largely untapped potential of clinical notes. Unstructured information, such as psychiatric evaluation and management notes, case management notes, clinical intake narratives, and treatment plans, is difficult to analyze in a traditional EHR view. But using InterSystems technology, which extracts concepts from structured and unstructured data, MHCD was able to capitalize on the data housed in its Netsmart system to give physicians the ability to bring the client story back into the data while still being able to work within their familiar clinical workflow, according to officials.

Now, MHCD can perform comprehensive analytics on all patient data without adding complexity to its IT infrastructure. This enables physicians to more easily evaluate patient progress and collectively determine next steps in treatment, helping improve the overall quality and delivery of patient care and speed time to recovery.

“We launched Netsmart’s solution at MHCD 16 months ago, replacing an EHR system we had used for 12 years,” Wes Williams, Ph.D., vice president and CIO at MHCD, said in a statement. “We outgrew the capabilities of our previous EHR, and we were constantly customizing and tweaking it to meet our requirements. With patient safety a paramount concern every day, we needed a new, stable platform that could help ensure that no information slips through the cracks, regardless of where data is captured, to provide us with a comprehensive view of a person’s health records so we can provide the best care possible.”

“The ability to have access to all of the information contained in an EHR is invaluable to our providers because healthcare doesn’t just happen in a clinical setting,” added Tom Herzog, COO at Netsmart. “Our clients’ and partners’ willingness and ability to develop these capabilities with us furthers our mission to integrate care across all communities, and we’re excited to continue to innovate with them.”

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Industry Groups Urge ONC to Reorient Goals of EHR Reporting Program, Focus on Health IT Safety, Security

October 18, 2018
by Heather Landi, Associate Editor
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Many healthcare industry groups would like to see the Electronic Health Record (EHR) Reporting Program for health IT developers include a strong focus on patient safety-related usability, EHR training, transparency on EHR vendors’ cybersecurity practices as well as cost transparency.

This feedback came in response to a request for information (RFI) issued by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC) in late August seeking public input on reporting criteria under the EHR Reporting Program for health IT developers, as required by the 21st Century Cures Act. The public comment period ended Oct. 17.

ONC issued the RFI on criteria to measure the performance of certified electronic health record technology (CEHRT). The Cures Act requires that health IT developers report information on certified health IT as a condition of certification and maintenance of certification under the ONC Health IT Certification Program.

According to the Cures Act, the EHR Reporting Program should examine several different functions of EHRs and reporting criteria should address the following five categories: security; interoperability; usability and user-centered design; conformance to certification testing; and other categories, as appropriate to measure the performance of certified EHR technology.

In its comments to ONC, the Bethesda, Md.-based American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) questioned what it views as the “constrained scope” of the EHR Reporting Program to “provide publicly available, comparative information on certified health IT,” to “inform acquisition upgrade, and customization decisions that best support end users’ needs.”

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Rather, AMIA urged ONC to develop the EHR Reporting Program to measure performance to improve CEHRT security, interoperability, and usability, and not be used simply to provide data for “acquisition decision makers.”

“Especially when viewed alongside the additional provisions in newly developed CEHRT Conditions of Certification, the EHR Reporting Program should be leveraged to bring transparency to how CEHRT performs in production environments with live patient data,” AMIA stated.

“ONC should develop an EHR Reporting Program that more closely approximates a post-implementation surveillance ecosystem, not a government-sponsored ‘consumer reports’,” AMIA wrote in its comments.

Such an ecosystem, AMIA stated, would “illuminate CEHRT performance used in production and would generate product performance data automatically, without users having to submit reporting criteria.”

As proof of concept, AMIA pointed to ONC’s existing nascent surveillance and oversight program for CEHRT that could be leveraged for the EHR Reporting Program. The group also referenced the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Digital Health Software Precertification Program as another example of a federal program that looks to utilize real-world production data.

In addition, AMIA recommends ONC develop interoperability reporting criteria for the EHR Reporting Program by building on previous RFIs meant to “measure interoperability,” including the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA) and ONC’s “Proposed Interoperability Standards Measurement Framework.”

And, the industry group also urged ONC to prioritize an additional measure that demonstrates a capability to provide patients with “a complete copy of their health information from an electronic record in a computable form.” “This focus would align with top-level HHS priorities to improve patient access to their data,” AMIA noted.

AMIA also recommends alignment between the EHR Reporting Program and other aspects of the Cures-mandated Conditions of Certification.

“The EHR Reporting Program is one more vital piece in improving both EHR performance and care quality,” AMIA president and CEO Douglas B. Fridsma, M.D., Ph.D., said in a statement. “We have a tremendous opportunity to leverage Cures provisions if we hone our focus on EHR performance in the real world.”

In its comments, the College of Healthcare Information Management Executives (CHIME) advises ONC against establishing any complex rating methodologies for scoring vendors. ONC should also consider establishing benchmarks by which to monitor interoperability progress among vendors, CHIME wrote. The organization noted that patients need better education on the risks of using application programming interfaces (APIs), and ONC should partner with their federal partners and stakeholders on this issue, CHIME said.

Many organizations, including CHIME, would like more information about vendors' ongoing support practices, such as the estimated costs of maintenance and software. The Medical Group Management Association (MGMA) recommended making software pricing structures for upfront and ongoing software, training and maintenance costs part of the Reporting Program, as well as all interoperability “connection” fees. MGMA also urged ONC to consider incorporating into the Reporting Program testing criteria that focused on the effectiveness of the EHR’s integration with practice management system software, and costs associated with it.

The American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) recommended that comparative information made publicly available under the EHR Reporting Program should also contain reporting criteria that reflects the entire lifecycle of the certified health IT product, including acquisition, implementation, ongoing maintenance, upgrades, additional product and/or application integration, and replacement.

Focus on Patient Safety-Related Usability and EHR Training

In its comments, AMIA also urged ONC to view health IT safety as a measurable byproduct of usable CEHRT deployed in live environments. “To understand CEHRT usability performance in situ, ONC should supplement user-reported measures with measure concepts that reflect the safety of health IT,” AMIA wrote.

MGMA recommended that the Reporting Program report on the ability of the software to identify and address patient safety issues. “Poor usability and inefficient clinician workflow can not only fail to prevent adverse events but can actually contribute to them,” the organization wrote.

In comments it submitted to ONC, Pew Charitable Trusts noted that the establishment of the EHR Reporting Program “has the potential to give health care providers, EHR developers, and other organizations better data to address barriers in the effective, efficient, and safe use of health information technology, and improve systems accordingly.”

“In particular, this program could unearth key details on how clinicians utilize EHRs to meet ONC’s goal of reducing clinician burden while improving patient safety. ONC should ensure that the reporting criteria focused on usability—which refers to the design of systems and how they are used by clinicians—also incorporate safety-related provisions,” Pew wrote in its letter.

Pew recommended reporting criteria focus primarily on testing EHR usability to promote patient safety. To this end, Pew identified four principles to guide usability-related reporting criteria—the adoption of a life-cycle approach to developing usability-related criteria; incorporating quantitative, measurable data; limiting burden on end-users; and ensuring transparent methods that prevent gamesmanship.

Pew also provided ideas for existing sources of information that could be adapted into or utilized as safety-related usability reporting criteria, such as the Leapfrog CPOE tool, safety surveillance data from ONC, the ONC SAFER Guides or a 2016 health IT safety measure report from NQF.

“As ONC implements this program, the agency should ensure that the usability aspects of the program focus on the facets of EHR usability that can contribute to unintended patient harm. To achieve that goal, ONC should consider the aforementioned principles in identifying reporting criteria, and data sources that could become part of the program,” Pew wrote in its comments.

Orem, Utah-based KLAS Research and the Arch Collaborative recommended the EHR Reporting Program include criteria focused on EHR training, as better clinician training is critical to EHR usability and clinician satisfaction, the two groups said. The Arch Collaborative is a KLAS-affiliated initiative comprising 5,000 providers.

The KLAS-Arch comment cited research findings based on responses by more than 50,000 physicians from more than 100 provider organizations around the globe that suggests EHR satisfaction and usability are directly related to the extent and quality of training users have received. The research indicates that organizations that focus on training to support clinician workflows have higher EHR satisfaction than those that don’t. What’s more, the higher the levels of personalization tool use by the clinicians, the higher the EHR satisfaction score, according to KLAS.

“EHRs are not simple enough to be operated efficiently without ample instruction. It is essential that new providers spend enough time learning how to use the EHR, and it is requisite that providers have the option to participate in ongoing training each year,” Taylor Davis, vice president of innovation at KLAS Research, wrote in the letter. “When an EHR training program is well designed, there will be a demand to attend. A trend that has been noted is that success begets success; when providers share how EHR training has improved their efficiency, their peers become more likely to participate. The key is that the providers must have the option to choose what works for them.”

Need for Greater Focus on Security Posture

The Healthcare and Public Health Sector Coordinating Council's cybersecurity working group highlighted, in its comments on the RFI, the need for more transparency on EHR vendors' cybersecurity posture as part of the criteria of the EHR Reporting Program.

“The challenges to our sector are abundant and we believe these attacks pose direct threats to patient safety,” the group wrote in its comments. The group urged ONC to factor into the EHR Reporting Program the growing incidences of cybersecurity attacks on the sector and the need to work collaboratively to address the threats.

The group outlined a number of items that would better inform providers of a vendors’ security practices, such as access to an auditor’s statement regarding the security posture of the vendor and its products, upon provider request, as well as a software security analysis, whether two-factor authentication is in use, information on role-based access controls and how roles are configured, and, with each release and update, the number of patches provided to address security-related issues.

The group also recommended ONC consider developing a more standard way for vendors to report vulnerabilities with health IT upgrades and releases.

 


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UnitedHealth Group Plans to Unveil Health Record for Members, Providers in 2019

October 17, 2018
by Rajiv Leventhal, Managing Editor
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Health insurer UnitedHealth Group will be unveiling a “fully integrated and fully portable individual health record,” CEO David Wichmann said on the on the company’s third-quarter earnings call yesterday.

Speaking to the insurer’s broader digital health strategy, Wichmann stated on the earnings call that the company’s consumer digital health platform, Rally—which is a website and mobile app—is now serving over 20 million registered users and will leveraged to help develop the health record.

“Rally is synthesizing information and engaging people to better manage their health, helping consumers save money by selecting the highest quality care providers, understanding their out-of-pocket costs up front, and in some markets even scheduling appointments for care. We will soon be releasing at scale a first-of-kind, fully integrated and fully portable individual health record that delivers personalized next-best health actions to people and their caregivers,” Wichmann said on the call.

While many more details are not yet known about the health record, Wichmann did say that by the end of 2019, the insurance giant has the goal of developing individual health records for the 50 million fully benefited members that it serves, as well as for their care providers.

He noted, “We would use the Rally chassis…to provide individuals in a way in which they can comprehend a tool, if you will, not only outlining their individual health record, but also giving them next-best action detail. That's what I mean by when I say it's deeply personalized. It's organized around them, not based upon generic criteria. It also assesses to what extent that they've been, and how they've been served by the health system broadly, and whether or not there's been any gaps in care that have been left behind.”

Giving a little bit more information about the vision UnitedHealth Group has in regard to the health record, Wichmann said, “You might imagine what that could ultimately lead to in terms of a continuing to develop a transaction flow between the physician and us and the consumer and us, as we us being the custodian to try to drive better health outcomes for people, but also ensure that the highest level of quality is adhered to.”

As of now, the platform appears to be more geared toward consumers than providers. Steven Halper, an analyst for financial services company Cantor Fitzgerald, noted in an update that “The Rally EHR should be able to tap into different EHRs that use APIs [application programming interfaces] and other interoperability standards, which are being more-widely adopted. Rally EHR should be viewed as a consumer engagement tool and not as a threat to legacy provider EHR products.”

UnitedHealth Group already has its Optum business line, a health innovation company that provides health services in an array of different ways, including through its growing data analytics capabilities.

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UC Davis Health’s Physician-Specific Approach to Addressing Burnout

October 16, 2018
by Rajiv Leventhal, Managing Editor
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To combat the physician burnout epidemic, one health system is taking matters into its own hands

Physician burnout has long been a significant healthcare challenge, but in recent years with the advent of various technologies into clinical workflows, along with an array of regulatory requirements, the problem seems to be getting worse.

Indeed, there is no shortage of research that backs up the notion that physicians are overburdened, with some surveys having found that 30 to 60 percent of clinicians report symptoms of burnout, which can threaten patient safety and physician health. What’s more, EHRs (electronic health records) are consistently cited as the top burnout factor, largely due to the time one must spend in them documenting and performing other administrative tasks. To this point, a commonly referenced study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine in 2016 found that for every hour physicians provide direct clinical face time to patients, nearly two additional hours are spent on EHR and desk work within the clinic day.

Although federal health officials have been outspoken about the need to combat these issues while improving physician satisfaction, some hospitals and have health systems have been taking matters into their own hands. In Sacramento, not long ago, clinical and IT leaders at the University of California, Davis (UC Davis) Health were eager to get funding to develop and roll-out a program to improve physician efficiency levels within the EHR.

Scott MacDonald, M.D., the health system’s EHR medical director, says that in order to get that funding, his team needed to show the organization’s leadership, via a pilot project, that a program designed around improving physician efficiency in the EHR was worthwhile and valuable. They ended up getting a small team together, mostly volunteers from various UC Davis Health locations, and piloted two high performing clinics and two low performing ones, based on efficiency data from Epic, MacDonald recalls.

In order to determine which clinics were doing well with their EHRs, and which ones were not, the UC Davis Health team looked at a number of factors. For one, they would examine a given individual physician to see if he or she was spending more than the average amount of time on certain EHR “in-basket” tasks, explains MacDonald. “We would then look and compare that data to others in that physician’s department and specialty to see if there were outliers. So that’s a useful tool for us to recognize that this person is efficient with chart reviews but inefficient with writing notes, [for example].”

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MacDonald says that they would also survey the physicians to see what they personally feel they are most inefficient with in the EHR. “We wanted to make sure that we address their biggest areas of frustration,” he says, noting that the organization is also looking to add a chief wellness officer to help accomplish this.

Problems in the Trenches

MacDonald says that his team, based on anecdotal conversations with physicians, believes that it’s “patently obvious that doctors are frustrated by EHRs and IT, as well as the other factors from the changes in the healthcare system over the last few years, as well as the regulatory environment.”

That said, MacDonald doesn’t believe that EHRs are hurting the physician-patient relationship; more so that they are “blamed” for hurting it. “Because of what’s happened over the course of the last decade, with lots of regulatory requirements, even going back to the 1990s with CMS [the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services] billing regulations, all those things have been addressed in a lot of organizations through the EHR. So people tend to shoot the messenger and blame the EHR for these ills. But the EHR is really just a tool, and if that tool is built and trained well, it’s certainly a real boon to the quality of care we deliver,” he says. “If people know how to use the tool effectively when they are seeing a patient, [it will] become a partner in the care with the patient, rather than a mediator of the care,” he emphasizes.

Providing some more context, MacDonald believes that if doctors have the computer screen up between them and the patient, and all the patient sees are the wires coming out of the back of the monitor, that doesn’t make for a good experience for the patient. “But if you are in a triangle with the patient and the monitor, and you are engaging the patient in the data you are looking at, then it could be a real positive. Across the U.S., we have not trained our physicians in that aspect of modern medicine. How we use the tool is part of the relationship with the patient,” he says.

A Program Designed for the Physician

UC Davis Health’s Physician Efficiency Program (PEP), modeled after the pilot project in the four clinics last year, tapped program manager Melissa Jost, who oversees six analysts. Teams of three are deployed to clinics to train and build features within the Epic EHR platform. What’s more, Jost supervises two builders and four trainers, an approach that MacDonald believes makes this program particularly unique. “We integrate the building and training in one team. So when we go out to the clinics and work with [physicians], we can not only show them how to use the tools that exist, but also build the tools if one doesn’t exist and there is something that is workflow-specific that’s needed.”

Each team spends up to six weeks in a clinic monitoring workflows, reviewing EHR-use metrics and working one-on-one with each physician to personalize and optimize their use of EHR tools. Clinics also reduce each physician’s patient schedule by 50 percent to allow time for the training sessions right in the clinic during normal clinic hours, with team members also available for follow-up questions or sessions on site, according to officials, who also note that the goal is to engage all primary and specialty care ambulatory physicians by 2020.

MacDonald admits that to date, the data isn’t perfect, but it gives his team broad strokes about how effective individuals, clinics and groups are using the EHR system. Nonetheless, officials point to some encouraging results from the program—namely a 12-percent increase in physician satisfaction, 24-percent increase in physician efficiency, and an average reduction of 25 hours less per month in time spent working after hours per physician trained.

And in terms of anecdotal physician feedback, MacDonald says that they love the program so far. “We have been getting rave reviews,” he notes, noting that he recently asked physicians at one clinic their feelings about the program and how it can improve, to which the near universal response was, “When are you coming back?”

When asked if physicians feel that the core problem with EHRs is the documentation requirements, or technical flaws in the systems themselves, MacDonald chalks it up to a “mix of everything.” He says that this type of tension is common in informatics, and people ask, “Why can’t Epic just do [X]?” But MacDonald notes that oftentimes the system actually can do that thing and the physician might not know how to do it. “Often, people’s frustrations can be easily met with simple training because the tools are already there from the vendor. But that’s not always the case, and that’s why we do additional build work to customize it,” he says.

MacDonald adds that in healthcare, there is always this “undercurrent of external requirements that don’t appear to people to have much clinical value,” such as reporting on quality measures, data collection, and regulatory requirements, but most physicians do reluctantly accept the necessity of these things by working in the modern healthcare system. “But if we can mitigate [the burden] by giving them a faster way of doing it, they will appreciate it,” he says.

 


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