Indiana Hospital Notifies 29,000 Patients of Data Breach | Healthcare Informatics Magazine | Health IT | Information Technology Skip to content Skip to navigation

Indiana Hospital Notifies 29,000 Patients of Data Breach

January 2, 2013
by Rajiv Leventhal
| Reprints

Indiana’s Gibson General Hospital has mailed letters to approximately 29,000 patients informing them of the theft of a hospital laptop containing personal health information. The information may have included a patient's name, address, social security number and/or clinical information.

The 70-bed hospital says it took immediate steps to investigate and attempt to recover the laptop and to prevent further access to its information system via the laptop, which had security features in place, including password protection. The laptop was reported stolen, along with several other items, from an employee's home during a burglary on Nov. 27. It has not yet been recovered, but Gibson General Hospital administration continues to work closely with local law enforcement in their investigation.

"There is no evidence to believe that the data on the laptop was the target of the theft or that any information has been or will be accessed for fraudulent purposes," Emmett Schuster, Gibson General Hospital president and CEO said in a statement. "As a precautionary measure and part of Gibson General Hospital's commitment to protecting patient privacy, we are notifying all patients potentially impacted by the incident."

The laptop was used by a hospital employee whose job requires 24/7 access to the hospital's electronic medical records (EMR) system. Information accessed on that laptop may have automatically been saved to the laptop by the software utilized to perform those job duties. Without the laptop, the hospital is unable to determine with certainty whose information is affected.

Topics

News

Survey: IT Expenses per Physician Continue to Rise to Nearly $19,000

Information technology (IT) expenses for physician practices are on a slow and steady rise for most practices, and last year, physician-owned practices spent between nearly $2,000 to $4,000 more per FTE physician on IT operating expenses than they did the prior year, according to a recent Medical Group Management Association (MGMA) survey.

Change Healthcare Joins Blockchain Initiative Hashed Health

Nashville-based Change Healthcare, one of the largest independent healthcare IT companies in the U.S., has announced that has joined the Hashed Health consortium, a firm dedicated to realizing the potential of blockchain and distributed ledger technologies.

Three Large Health Systems Join North Carolina’s HIE

Three of the largest health systems in North Carolina, Duke Health, Novant Health and Carolinas HealthCare System, have signed agreements to connect to NC HealthConnex, North Carolina’s state-designated health information exchange (HIE).

Study: What do Patients Value about Reading Their Visit Notes?

New research on the OpenNotes initiative has revealed multiple core themes on what patients value most about having access to their visit notes.

Digital Health Venture Capital Funding Tops $4 Billion in First Half of 2017

Global venture capital (VC) funding for health IT companies in the first half of 2017 was 36 percent higher year-over-year with a record $4 billion raised in 359 deals versus the $3 billion raised from 286 deals in the first half of 2016, according to a report from Mercom Capital Group.

Survey: 76 Percent of Health IT Execs Confident that IoT Devices are Protected

A survey of IT decision-makers within the healthcare industry found that the majority of IT departments believe that existing security solutions for laptops and servers can also protect connected Internet of Things (IoT) medical devices.