NSF Awards Rice University $10 million for Bioimaging Project | Healthcare Informatics Magazine | Health IT | Information Technology Skip to content Skip to navigation

NSF Awards Rice University $10 million for Bioimaging Project

February 28, 2018
by Heather Landi
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The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded $10 million to a Rice University-led team that hopes to create wearable and point-of-care microscopes that use on-chip illumination and sensing to non-invasively aid in the diagnosis and monitoring of nearly 100 health conditions that today require a biopsy or blood test.

“The project will produce a platform technology for in vivo, 3-D tissue imaging, with the aim of being able to point a camera to a part of the body and see live biology below the skin without making an incision or drawing blood," Rice professor Ashutosh Sabharwal, the principal investigator on the grant, said in a statement.

Sabharwal's team, which includes 11 co-investigators from Rice, Carnegie Mellon, Harvard, MIT and Cornell, is one of three groups to win new five-year grants today from the NSF's Expeditions in Computing program. Expeditions is an interdisciplinary NSF effort that constitutes the agency's largest single investment in computer and information science research. Since 2008, NSF has invested more than $200 million in Expeditions projects.

“Expeditions supports transformative research, and our goal is to create miniaturized, light-based microscopes for use in wearables, point-of-care, bedside diagnostics, ambulances, operating rooms and more," Sabharwal, professor of electrical and computer engineering, said.

Anyone who has pointed a flashlight at their palm to make their hand glow knows that light can travel through the body. But visible light scatters so much as it passes through soft tissue that it has not been useful for medical imaging, according to the researchers.

Sabharwal's team will attempt to unravel this scattered light puzzle with a technique called “computational scatterography.” They'll use a combination of mathematical algorithms, camera design and imaging sensors to reverse engineer the path of scattered light.

“Basically, we're trying to ‘de-scatter’ the light,” computational imaging expert and Rice co-investigator Ashok Veeraraghavan, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering, said in a statement.

Sabharwal pointed to white blood cell count (WBC) tests as an example of the project's potential impact. In the U.S., oncologists use millions of WBC tests each week to monitor chemotherapy patients. WBC tests require a finger prick or blood draw and a laboratory, which means they can be performed only at hospitals and clinics.

“Imagine a wearable device no larger than a watch that uses sensors to continuously measure white blood cell count and wirelessly communicate with the oncologist's office,” Sabharwal said. “The patient could go about their daily life. They'd only have to go to the hospital if there was a problem.”

Sabharwal also said the platform technology will be able to spinoff into many products that can be used in the care of nearly 100 health conditions.


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