Report: Healthcare Orgs Unprepared for Societal, Liability Issues of AI and IoT | Healthcare Informatics Magazine | Health IT | Information Technology Skip to content Skip to navigation

Report: Healthcare Orgs Unprepared for Societal, Liability Issues of AI and IoT

June 11, 2018
by
| Reprints

The healthcare industry is aggressively adopting intelligent technologies, such as the internet of things (IoT) and artificial intelligence (AI), but many health organizations need new capabilities to ensure that technology acts with responsibility and transparency as businesses evolve, according to a new Accenture report.

According to Accenture’s Digital Health Technology Vision 2018 report, more than three-fourths (77 percent) of the 100 health executives surveyed said they expect to invest in IoT and smart sensors this year — the highest among the 20 industries included in the broader Accenture Technology Vision research on which the health industry report was based. In addition, more than half (53 percent) of the health executives expect to invest in AI systems, with four-fifths (86 percent) of the executives saying that their organizations use data to drive automated decision-making at an unprecedented scale.

And, a majority of health executives (85 percent) surveyed agree that every human will be directly impacted on a daily basis by an AI-based decision within the next three years, and most (80 percent) agree that within the next two years, AI will work next to humans in their organization, as a coworker, collaborator and trusted advisor.

At the same time, healthcare executives using technology responsibly and in a transparent manner is critical. Ninety-two percent of health executives believe that ensuring the security of consumer data is important or very important to gain customers’ trust.

The study identified a range of issues related to the aggressive adoption of AI and the greater role it plays in healthcare decision-making, and the report also counsels the need for organizations to instill trust and transparency into the design of their technology systems.  

Eighty percent of surveyed health executives believe AI is advancing faster than their organization’s pace of adoption. More concerning, 81 percent of health executives agree that organizations are not prepared to face the societal and liability issues that will require them to explain their AI-based actions and decisions, should issues arise, according to the Accenture survey. As a result, 73 percent said they plan to develop internal ethical standards for AI to ensure that their systems act responsibly.

In addition, health organizations also face a new kind of vulnerability: inaccurate, manipulated and biased data that leads to corrupted insights and skewed results. More than five-sixths (86 percent) of health executives have not yet invested in capabilities to verify data sources across their most critical systems. In addition, one-fourth (24 percent) of the executives said that they have been the target of adversarial AI behaviors, like falsified location data or bot fraud.

The Accenture report also predicts key trends likely to disrupt business over the next three years, including virtual/augmented reality, blockchain and edge computing. Among the findings from healthcare executives about these technologies:

  • More than four in five (82 percent) of the executives said that extended reality—comprising virtual- and augmented-reality technologies—removes the hurdle of distance in access to people, information and experience, with nearly half (48 percent) of health providers and one-sixth (16 percent) of health payers planning to invest in these technologies in the next year.
  • Nine-tenths (91 percent) of health executives believe that blockchain and smart contracts are critical to enabling a frictionless business over the next three years, and approximately the same number (88 percent) believe that microservices will be crucial for scaling and integrating ecosystem partnerships. 
  • Four-fifths (82 percent) of health executives believe that “edge” architecture will speed the maturity of hyperconnected health environments, and slightly more (85 percent) believe that generating real-time insights from the volumes of data expected in the future will require computing “at the edge,” where data is generated. Yet the vast majority (86 percent) of health executives believe that they’ll need to balance cloud and edge computing to maximize technology infrastructure agility and enable intelligence everywhere throughout their organization.

“Intelligent technologies, such as AI, are enabling health organizations to evolve at speed, collaborate with other entities and create deeper, more meaningful relationships with patients across various care settings,” Kaveh Safavi, M.D., head of Accenture’s global health practice, said in a statement. “As this paradigm-shifting technology evolves—making business more dynamic than ever before—organizations will remain responsible for demonstrating data stewardship and designing systems with trust and transparency to bolster the societal benefits of these technologies.” 

 

Get the latest information on Health IT and attend other valuable sessions at this two-day Summit providing healthcare leaders with educational content, insightful debate and dialogue on the future of healthcare and technology.

Learn More

Topics

News

White House Proposes Restructuring, Renaming HHS as Part of Broad Reorganization Plan

A sweeping government reorganization plan released by the White House Thursday proposes restructuring and renaming HHS, including moving many public assistance programs from USDA to HHS.

CMS Introduces Data Element Library

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has announced the launch of its Data Element Library (DEL), with the overarching goal to support the exchange of electronic health information.

Data Breach at Health Billing Company Exposes PHI of 270,000 People

A healthcare data breach at Med Associates, a Lathan, N.Y.-based health billing company, that may have exposed the protected health information (PHI) of 270,000 people, according to local media reports.

CMS to Host Blue Button 2.0 Developer Conference

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services will host the first Blue Button 2.0 Developer Conference at the General Services Administration national headquarters in Washington, D.C., on Monday, Aug. 13, 2018.

House Passes Bill to Align HIPAA, 42 CFR Part 2

The U.S. House of Representatives recently passed a bill designed to align 42 CFR Part 2 with HIPAA for the purposes of health care treatment, payment, and operations. One goal of the change is so that care can be better coordinated and providers can have appropriate access to all of a patient’s medical record, including information about substance use disorders.

MedStar Health Awarded Grant to Pilot Apps for Patient-Reported Outcome Data

A team of researchers from Maryland-based MedStar Health has been awarded an 18-month contract from AHRQ to support the development and testing of technical tools and apps that can be used to collect patient-reported outcome data.