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KLAS: Providers Looking for Next Level of Healthcare Analytics

January 7, 2014
by Rajiv Leventhal
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When it comes to healthcare analytics, most vendors are struggling to deliver ease of use and robust functionality, according to a new report from the Orem, Utah-based KLAS Research.

With movement toward value-based care, newer healthcare models, and accountable care organizations (ACOs), providers' analytics needs and expectations are by necessity continuing to rise. As providers look to go to the next level with healthcare analytics, there is still a notable discrepancy between what most vendors deliver and what providers require, according to the report, “Healthcare Analytics: Making Sense of the Puzzle Pieces.”

The energy around healthcare analytics continues to surge, and concurrently, the opportunity for revolutionary solutions and outcomes is more urgent than ever before, according to the report. "The pressure is mounting," Joe Van De Graaff, report author, said in a statement. "Providers see analytics as a strategic compass for the changing healthcare world ahead, and their need for better results and better ways to understand outcomes through data analytics and BI is critical."

KLAS spoke to more than 400 healthcare providers to capture their experiences with their BI vendor products. Forty-seven percent of respondents reported extensive insights from their BI tool. Top satisfaction ratings in four categories of BI products go to QlikTech (Radnor, Pa.) for visual data discovery, Health Catalyst (Salt Lake City, Utah) for data warehouse/enterprise data warehousing), and Dimensional Insights (Burlington, Mass.) for BI tool sets. Clients put SAS (Cary, N.C.) at the top for predictive analytics.

Additionally, the aggregation and analysis of multiple sources of data, common functions of BI, are often functional requirements for population health analytics. Some vendors in this report, enterprise vendors in particular, can be used for analysis and reporting on population health–related metrics, but they generally lack in packaged patient outreach and care management functionality, the report found.

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