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Mayo Clinic, Gentag Partner for Wearable Biosensors

March 6, 2015
by Rajiv Leventhal
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The Mayo Clinic and the Washington D.C.-based Gentag, Inc. are collaborating to develop wearable biosensors designed to fight obesity and diabetes.

The wearable patch sensors are the size of a small bandage, and are designed to be painless, wireless and disposable, officials said in a press release announcement.  In the bandage is a sensor that communicates via a closed-loop diabetes management system which is compatible with cell phones. The system will allow researchers to monitor movement and develop treatments for obesity and related conditions, officials say.

A joint intellectual property (IP) agreement with Mayo Clinic made the research and development of this tool possible. Gentag signed a patent pooling agreement with Mayo Clinic for the management of IP related to wearable patch sensor and wireless communication technologies. Under the agreement, certain patent rights and technologies of both Mayo Clinic and Gentag will be combined and commercialized.

The two firms will collaborate with third parties under license to bring Mayo Clinic's expertise in medicine and clinical practices to the public by the development of the next generation of wearable skin patch technologies from Gentag in the areas of diabetes and obesity management. More than 50 issued patents and technologies are being offered for licensing under the agreement.

"We are hoping that this technology will be game-changer. These patch biosensors may help us reduce global obesity and diabetes," says James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist and obesity researcher, said in the announcement. "They are accurate, inexpensive, and can be integrated into the care people receive."

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