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Nurses, Physicians Use Personal Devices Even When BYOD is Prohibited

September 21, 2017
by Rajiv Leventhal
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Some seven in 10 (71 percent) hospitals now allow BYOD (bring your own device) in the workplace, according to a new survey, which also found that some healthcare professionals use personal devices for work even when BYOD is not allowed.
 
The research, from Spok, Inc., included responses from more than 350 healthcare professionals. The 2017 research indicated that 71 percent of hospitals allow BYOD, compared to 58 percent in 2016. The researchers said, however, that the apparent increase may be an artifact of participant self-selection to take a BYOD-specific survey, but it does match their industry experience and interactions with customers where they see the majority of hospitals allowing physicians to use their personal devices.
 
Healthcare organizations around the U.S. continue to wrestle with whether staff are allowed to use their personal mobile devices for work. For those that don't have BYOD policies, data security is the top reason why, according to the research. Nonetheless, 41 percent of nurse respondents and 63 percent of physician respondents said they use personal devices for work even when their organization has a policy that prohibits it. 
 
Hospital-issued devices are preferred by 59 percent of nurses and 38 percent of physicians, the findings showed. The top reasons for using them in the healthcare work environment are ease in communicating with other care team members, cost savings, and workflow time savings, per the survey's results. 
 
Meanwhile, on average, physicians use four different work-related technology applications,while nurses use three on average, according to the research. Electronic health record (EHR) mobile applications specifically were ranked a 3.5 out of 5 by respondents when it comes to reliability. 
 
What's more, the top three challenges for BYOD environments are the same challenges reported for mobile device usage at hospitals in general: Wi-Fi coverage, data security, and cellular coverage.
 

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Report: At-Risk Medicare Seniors the Next Apple Watch Target?

January 18, 2019
by Rajiv Leventhal, Managing Editor
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Apple is engaging in discussions with multiple private Medicare insurers about subsidizing the cost of the Apple Watch for at-risk people over 65 years old, according to a CNBC report.

This week’s report, from health tech reporter Christina Farr, noted, “The insurers are exploring ways to subsidize the cost of the device for those who can't afford the $279 price tag, which is the starting cost of an older model.”

The latest version of the Apple Watch—the Series 4—was launched in September, and as officials of the tech giant stated at the time, brings “advanced activity and communications features, along with revolutionary health capabilities, including a new accelerometer and gyroscope, which are able to detect hard falls, and an electrical heart rate sensor that can take an electrocardiogram (ECG) using the new ECG app.” This version retails for at least $399.

According to the CNBC report, “Apple has paid a visit to several of the largest insurers in the market, as well as some smaller, venture-backed Medicare Advantage plans. The people declined to be named as the discussions are still private.”

The watch’s electrocardiogram function and fall detection capabilities particularly make it appealing and valuable for seniors; about 19 million seniors, and growing, are enrolled in a Medicare Advantage plan, which are private health plans that receive government payouts for providing services to seniors—about $10,000 per member, on average, Farr’s report noted.

According to Apple, the new Series 4 Apple Watch intermittently analyzes heart rhythms in the background and sends a notification if an irregular heart rhythm such as AFib is detected.  It can also alert the user if the heart rate exceeds or falls below a specified threshold.

And, the Apple Watch’s fall detection function utilizes a next-generation accelerometer and gyroscope, which measures up to 32 g-forces, along with custom algorithms to identify when hard falls occur, the company has stated.

To this end, data from health technology company HealthMine shows that 21 percent of Medicare Advantage beneficiaries use a fitness/activity/steps tracker; and 70 percent currently use digital tools, with a blood pressure monitor being used by 50 percent of beneficiaries.

In this realm, Apple is working with other major insurers as well. It was recently announced that UnitedHealthcare Motion, an employer-sponsored wellness program, is telling its participants they can get a free Apple Watch if they meet the insurer’s daily walking goals over a six-month period. For this initiative, program participants can use the Apple Watch to see how they are tracking against the program’s three daily goals—frequency, intensity, and tenacity—helping integrate physical activity and engagement with their health plan.

Industry observers have already begun to offer some reaction to CNBC’s story. In Farr’s report, Bob Sheehy, the CEO of Bright Health, an insurance start-up with a Medicare Advantage plan, and the former CEO of United Healthcare, spoke to the idea of seniors potentially avoiding expensive care visits by leveraging the device. “Avoiding one emergency room visit would more than pay for the device," said Sheehy.

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PerfectServe Acquisition of Telmediq Consolidates Secure Communication Platforms

January 17, 2019
by David Raths, Contributing Editor
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Combined companies have more than 500,000 clinical users across 250 hospitals, 27,000 physician practices and post-acute care organizations

PerfectServe, a provider of cloud-based clinical communication and collaboration solutions, has acquired competitor Telmediq, a secure communications platform provider for health settings.

Knoxville, Tenn.-based PerfectServe said it plans to support both solutions going forward, taking advantage of each platform’s cloud-based, service-oriented architecture to integrate complementary features.

Telmediq is deployed across 300 healthcare organizations and 80,000 users. It offers a call center solution, nurse mobility, advanced alert and alarm management capabilities, and mass notification functionality. Combined, PerfectServe and Telmediq have more than 500,000 clinical users across 250 hospital sites and 27,000 physician practices and post-acute care organizations. 

PerfectServe said the acquisition is an important step in its effort to build a care team collaboration platform that unifies the entire care team across the continuum, from inpatient, to outpatient, to patients at home. “Our vision is to build a platform that is separate from, transcends, and is fully integrated with the EHR and all other point-of-care technologies,” said Terry Edwards, president and CEO of PerfectServe, in a prepared statement. “The goal is to make it easy for clinicians to overcome persistent care coordination challenges that have existed in the industry for years.”

The Telmediq acquisition follows an investment last year in PerfectServe by private equity firm K1 Investment Management.

 

 

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Research: By 2023, 5M Consumers will be Remotely Monitored by Providers

January 15, 2019
by Rajiv Leventhal, Managing Editor
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Wearables, including health trackers and remote patient monitoring devices, are set to become “must-haves” in the delivery of healthcare, with an annual spend on these devices reaching an estimated $20 billion by 2023, according to new research.

The exploration into mobile devices, and more broadly digital health, conducted by Juniper Research, also noted that assistive “hearables,” or connected hearing aids made available via healthcare providers, as well as directly to customers at varying price models, will mean this sector generates revenues of over $40 billion by 2022. Together, healthcare spending in the wearables market is projected to reach $60 billion by 2023, according to the report.

The research found that adoption of healthcare wearables will be driven by improvements in remote patient monitoring technology, in addition to increased adoption by medical institutions. Juniper forecasts that 5 million individuals will be remotely monitored by healthcare providers by 2023.

The research also forecasts that the advanced ability of AI (artificial intelligence)-enabled software analytics to proactively identify individuals at risk of their condition worsening will witness increased confidence among medical practitioners and regulators with regard to sensor accuracy.

As wearables become part of patients’ treatment plans, manufacturers will seek to adjust their business models and generate revenues from devices being monitored. An example of this would be selling data produced by the devices to insurance providers, the researchers noted. Juniper forecasts that service revenues of this nature will reach $855 million by 2023.

However, data privacy and consent will continue to be a significant barrier. Improving healthcare systems, such as using AI-enabled software analytics, is contingent on patient data being anonymized. Some insurance providers are changing the dynamics; in order to be covered, they require a data feed from the policyholder’s device, the researchers explained.

Research author Michael Larner stated, “It is vital that patients are made aware of how their personal data will be used. If not, making wearables a ‘must-have’ to provide personalized care or receive medical insurance risks a backlash from patients and heightened regulatory scrutiny; stalling the effectiveness of remote monitoring.”

To this end, in a recent study published in Health Affairs, researchers looked at new digital health solutions—both consumer-facing and provider-facing—and concluded that while there is real collective potential in these solutions to address significant healthcare challenges, to date, there simply have not been studies that evaluated effectiveness in terms of reducing cost or improving access to care. Furthermore, clinical effectiveness studies with a high level of evidence were uncommon, according to this research.

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