Mount Sinai Launches Telehealth Initiatives | Healthcare Informatics Magazine | Health IT | Information Technology Skip to content Skip to navigation

Mount Sinai Launches Telehealth Initiatives

March 16, 2015
by Rajiv Leventhal
| Reprints

The New York City-based Mount Sinai Heath System has announced the launch of various telehealth initiatives, aiming to improve care without having patients set foot in a doctor’s office.

Among the first telehealth pilot projects to get underway, the Primary Care Program, will allow physicians in the Mount Sinai Doctors Faculty Practice to offer remote patient consults using a digital connection.  What’s more, patients can now consult remotely with physicians through the telestroke program under the leadership of Aaron Tansy, M.D., the director of the stroke program at Mount Sinai Queens (MSQ). The physicians can also directly consult with their colleagues at The Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan providing a broader scope of expertise to help diagnose and treat patients.

Another telehealth program in partnership with a community healthcare center in upstate New York enables patients from rural areas to directly consult with Mount Sinai Health System pediatric epilepsy specialists. This technology is also extending to the ED, where a program has been launched to reduce readmissions and provide better patient outcomes by allowing healthcare professionals to communicate via telehealth with chronically ill patients in their homes before their symptoms cause them to seek care in the ED. The pilot telehealth projects are overseen by the Department of Information Technology at Mount Sinai.

“Technology has evolved to a point where it is less of a novelty in our doctors’ offices and more of an essential part of our physicians’ toolkits—and, indeed, an everyday part of our patients’ lives.  The time has come for telehealth to move to the next level by putting it into wider practice, and we’re proud to have done that here at Mount Sinai, which is at the forefront of the telehealth revolution,” said Kumar Chatani, executive vice president and CIO for the Mount Sinai Health System. 

Get the latest information on Health IT and attend other valuable sessions at this two-day Summit providing healthcare leaders with educational content, insightful debate and dialogue on the future of healthcare and technology.

Learn More

Topics

News

Dignity Health, UCSF Health Partner to Improve the Digital Patient Experience

Dignity Health and UCSF Health are collaborating to develop a digital engagement platform that officials believe will provide information and access to patients when and where they need it as they navigate primary and preventive care, as well as more acute or specialty care.

Report: Digital Health VC Funding Surges to Record $4.9 Billion in 2018

Global venture capital funding for digital health companies in the first half of 2018 was 22 percent higher year-over-year (YoY) with a record $4.9 billion raised in 383 deals compared to the $4 billion in 359 deals in the same time period last year, according to Mercom Capital Group’s latest report.

ONC Roundup: Senior Leadership Changes Spark Questions

The Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC) has continued to experience changes within its upper leadership, leading some folks to again ponder what the health IT agency’s role will be moving forward.

Media Report: Walmart Hires Former Humana Executive to Run Health Unit

Reigniting speculation that Walmart and insurer Humana are exploring ways to forge a closer partnership, Walmart Inc. has hired a Humana veteran to run its health care business, according to a report from Bloomberg.

Value-Based Care Shift Has Halted, Study Finds

A new study of 451 physicians and health plan executives suggests that progress toward value-based care has stalled. In fact, it may have even taken a step backward over the past year, the research revealed.

Study: EHRs Tied with Lower Hospital Mortality, But Only After Systems Have Matured

Over the past decade, there has been significant national investment in electronic health record (EHR) systems at U.S. hospitals, which was expected to result in improved quality and efficiency of care. However, evidence linking EHR adoption to better care is mixed, according to medical researchers.