New Clinical Informatics Program Aims to Prepare Pathologists | Healthcare Informatics Magazine | Health IT | Information Technology Skip to content Skip to navigation

New Clinical Informatics Program Aims to Prepare Pathologists

July 11, 2014
by Rajiv Leventhal
| Reprints

The College of American Pathologists (CAP) and the Association for Pathology Informatics (API) have launched a new graduate medical education clinical informatics curriculum.

The curriculum—Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents (PIER)— is designed to address the educational needs of pathologists in the evolving healthcare landscape, which includes the widespread adoption of electronic health records (EHR), spurred in large part by meaningful use and related federal programs. This is changing the way healthcare providers interact with laboratory information. As such, now, more than ever, pathologists need to be well-versed in the field of clinical informatics in order to deliver high quality and cost-effective patient care, according to a CAP news release.

Jointly developed by the three organizations, PIER presents informatics topics identified by leading experts in the field, say CAP officials. It offers key training elements for residency program directors and faculty to implement informatics training, while meeting the milestone requirements outlined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME).

PIER is designed for all pathology residents—those specializing in anatomic or clinical pathology, or both. The curriculum exposes residents to information technology in pathology as they participate in their anatomic and/or clinical pathology rotations and residency activities related to management; quality assurance and control; and regulatory and accreditation issues; as well as the daily flow of information into and out of the laboratory and the proper utilization of that information. Each topic includes key outcomes mapped to pathology informatics ACGME milestone levels.

“Information management will continue to play a crucial role in pathology,” said Walter Henricks, M.D., medical director of Pathology Informatics at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio, and co-leader of the PIER working group. “By developing PIER, we are empowering pathologists in clinical informatics with the knowledge and skill sets necessary to meet the demands of the current and future healthcare environment.”

Read the source article at College of American Pathologists

Get the latest information on Meaningful Use and attend other valuable sessions at this two-day Summit providing healthcare leaders with educational content, insightful debate and dialogue on the future of healthcare and technology.

Learn More

Topics

News

Former Michigan Governor to Serve as Chair of DRIVE Health

Former Michigan Governor John Engler will serve as chair of the DRIVE Health Initiative, a campaign aimed at accelerating the U.S. health system's transition to value-based care.

NJ Medical Group Launches Statewide HIE, OneHealth New Jersey

The Medical Society of New Jersey (MSNJ) recently launched OneHealth New Jersey, a statewide health information exchange (HIE) that is now live.

Survey: 70% of Providers Using Off-Premises Computing for Some Applications

A survey conducted by KLAS Research found that 70 percent of healthcare organizations have moved at least some applications or IT infrastructure off-premises.

AMIA Warns of Tax Bill’s Impact on Graduate School Programs in Informatics

Provisions in the Republican tax bill that would count graduate student tuition waivers as taxable income would have detrimental impacts on the viability of fields such as informatics, according to the American Medical Informatics Association.

Appalachia Project to Study Relationship Between Increased Broadband Access, Improved Cancer Care

The Federal Communications Commission and the National Cancer Institute have joined forces to focus on how increasing broadband access and adoption in rural areas can improve the lives of rural cancer patients.

Survey: By 2019, 60% of Medicare Revenues will be Tied to Risk

Medical groups and health systems that are members of AMGA (the American Medical Group Association) expect that nearly 60 percent of their revenues from Medicare will be from risk-based products by 2019, according to the results from a recent survey.