Report: Infection Control Systems Bring Positives, Negatives | Healthcare Informatics Magazine | Health IT | Information Technology Skip to content Skip to navigation

Report: Infection Control Systems Bring Positives, Negatives

August 27, 2012
by Gabriel Perna
| Reprints

According to a research report from the Orem, Utah-based KLAS, approximately 30 percent of healthcare providers with an infection control system say even though they couldn't live without it, there are tradeoffs. The findings were released in a KLAS report, Infection Control 2012: Breaking the Barriers and Getting Value, also found that70 percent of those without a solution haven't been able to justify the expense.

The report’s authors found that most infection control practitioners, IT directors, and clinical directors use their systems for the burden of increasingly complex, mandatory government reporting. Only a few use it to actively monitor hospital acquired infection rates.

However, according to report author Coray Tate, government incentives and value-based purchasing may change system usage dramatically. "In an age of analytics, most infection preventionists are still mired in mandatory reporting. But so many requirements are coming down the pike that infection control solutions might go from being nice to have to being a must-have,” he said in a statement.

Currently, infection control is still a best-of-breed market, with enterprise vendors Cerner and Epic still in development for their solutions, the report says. All vendors were reported to have gaps, but small-hospital leader CareFusion led in product training and ease of use. Large-hospital leader Hospira led in good interfacing and mandated reporting. KLAS also reported on performance from vendors Premier, Sentri7 (Wolters Kluwer), Vecna, and VigiLanz. 

"Although a system is a hundred times better than paper, all infection control vendors have room to improve their products and bring better value-which will help providers justify buying a system," Tate said.

 

Get the latest information on Health IT and attend other valuable sessions at this two-day Summit providing healthcare leaders with educational content, insightful debate and dialogue on the future of healthcare and technology.

Learn More

Topics

News

KLAS Research: Small Hospitals’ Buying Decisions Impacting EMR Market Share

A new KLAS Research report tracks shifts in electronic medical record (EMR) vendor market share among acute care hospitals, and finds that smaller hospitals are seeking technology solutions that meet their needs and limited budgets, and these contracts are making a mark on the EMR market.

Survey: Majority of Providers Predict Success for New Generic Drug Company, Project Rx

Back in January, four health systems, in consultation with the VA, announced a collaboration to develop a new, not-for-profit generic drug company. A survey has found that 90 percent of providers say they would become customers of the new venture.

Personalized Medicine Awareness Low Among U.S. Adults, Survey Finds

Genetics and personalized medicine are not top of mind for the general public in the U.S., according to a recent survey from GenomeWeb and the Personalized Medicine Coalition.

Industry Organizations Praise Senate Passage of VA Mission Act

The U.S. Senate on Wednesday passed, by a vote of 92-5, a major Veterans Affairs (VA) reform bill that includes health IT-related provisions to improve health data exchange between VA healthcare providers and community care providers.

NIH Issues Funding Announcement for All of Us Genomic Research Program

The National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) “All of Us” Research Program has issued a funding announcement for genome centers to generate genotype and whole genome sequence data from participants’ biosamples.

MGMA: Physician Compensation Data Illustrates Nationwide PCP Shortage

Primary care physicians’ compensation rose by more than 10 percent over the past five years, representing an increase which is nearly double that of specialty physicians’ compensation over the same period, according to the Medical Group Management Association (MGMA).