Research Shows Effectiveness of EMR in Positively Impacting Clinical Outcomes | Healthcare Informatics Magazine | Health IT | Information Technology Skip to content Skip to navigation

Research Shows Effectiveness of EMR in Positively Impacting Clinical Outcomes

August 12, 2014
by Rajiv Leventhal
| Reprints

New research suggests a measurable beneficial relationship between the adoption of electronic medical records (EMRs) and hospital performance, as measured by mortality rates.

The findings were revealed by HIMSS Analytics, the research arm of the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society, and Healthgrades, an online resource for comprehensive information about physicians and hospitals. The value of EMRs has long been discussed in trade and consumer news, but until now evaluations have lacked comprehensive clinical data, according to HIMSS officials.

Using HIMSS Analytics’ Electronic Medical Record Adoption Model (EMRAM) and mortality rate measures collected by Healthgrades across 19 unique procedure and condition based clinical cohorts, the analysis found that hospitals with advanced EMR capabilities (as reflected in high EMRAM scores) demonstrated significantly improved actual mortality rates, most notably for heart attack, respiratory failure, and small intestine surgery. Most cohorts experienced improvement in predicted mortality rates when compared to hospitals with lower EMRAM scores. The predicted mortality rate is an indicator of the level of documentation and capture of patient risk factors that are correlated to increased risk of mortality.   

“While the findings are what we would have expected, they’re definitely encouraging to those having invested so much in an EMR and now weathering criticisms,” Lorren Pettit, HIMSS Analytics Vice president of market research, said in a statement. “Given the robustness of the data sets used to conduct this analysis, it’s my hope that we’ve set a standard by which other attempts to evaluate the effectiveness of the EMR will be measured against.”

In total, 4,583 facility records were selected from the HIMSS Analytics database, representing the total number of facilities with complete data from 2010 through 2012.

This evaluation is represented as initial findings, and while it doesn’t point to a causal relationship it does indicate a difference in performance.  HIMSS Analytics says it will continue to study the relationship and conduct further analysis.

Topics

News

Appalachia Project to Study Relationship Between Increased Broadband Access, Improved Cancer Care

The Federal Communications Commission and the National Cancer Institute have joined forces to focus on how increasing broadband access and adoption in rural areas can improve the lives of rural cancer patients.

Survey: By 2019, 60% of Medicare Revenues will be Tied to Risk

Medical groups and health systems that are members of AMGA (the American Medical Group Association) expect that nearly 60 percent of their revenues from Medicare will be from risk-based products by 2019, according to the results from a recent survey.

83% of Physicians Have Experienced a Cyber Attack, Survey Finds

Eighty-three percent of physicians in a recent survey said that they have experienced some sort of cyber attack, such as phishing and viruses.

Community Data Sharing: Eight Recommendations From San Diego

A learning guide focuses on San Diego’s experience in building a community health information exchange and the realities of embarking on a broad community collaboration to achieve better data sharing.

HealthlinkNY’s Galanis to Step Down as CEO

Christina Galanis, who has served as president and CEO of HealthlinkNY for the past 13 years, will leave her position at the end of the year.

Email-Related Cyber Attacks a Top Concern for Providers

U.S. healthcare providers overwhelmingly rank email as the top source of a potential data breach, according to new research from email and data security company Mimecast and conducted by HIMSS Analytics.