Survey: BYOD Has Strong Support from Providers | Healthcare Informatics Magazine | Health IT | Information Technology Skip to content Skip to navigation

Survey: BYOD Has Strong Support from Providers

February 28, 2012
by Gabriel Perna
| Reprints

Aruba Networks, Inc. (Sunnyvale, Calif.) recently released the results from a survey focused on the networking priorities of more than 130 healthcare information technology professionals regarding the “Bring Your Own Device” initiatives. The results showed these initiatives were being embraced with varying levels of access to business applications.

In total, 85 percent of respondents said that they are supporting their physicians’ and staffs’ use of personal devices at work. Regarding current and planned network use, 50 percent of those surveyed said that they were planning to expand or refresh their Wi-Fi infrastructure in the next 12 months, while 35 percent said the same for their wired networks. A whopping 93 percent reported that they owned and managed their own network infrastructure, rather than outsourcing it to a network service provider.

In terms of particular devices, 83 percent of survey respondents said that they supported the use of Apple iPads on the network, with 65 percent saying the same for iPhones and iPod touches. Healthcare is one market where Blackberry use still outpaces Android-based devices, with 52 percent supporting the former and 46 percent supporting Android tablets and/or phones.

Fifty-eight percent said that they currently use or plan to use desktop virtualization solutions such as Citrix to enable hospital application use on iPads, while 45 percent said they would use in-house or third-party applications.  Electronic Medical Records (EMR) applications were far and away the most often supported applications on mobile devices, with 60 percent of respondents saying their organizations do so. EMR was followed by picture archiving and communication systems (PACS), Secure Messaging, and Voice over IP (VoIP), each in the 30 percent range.

Seventy-six percent of respondents said that they provide Internet access to patients and visitors, with 58 percent doing so through open networks with no password protection. Seventy-five percent also noted that their hospital applications were available remotely to clinics, physicians and others.   

Topics

News

Survey: 75 Percent of CIOs Concerned About Incomplete, Inaccurate Medication Data

Despite multidisciplinary efforts to improve medication reconciliation, hospital CIOs still report unsatisfactory results, with three out of four concerned that their organization’s medication history data is incomplete or inaccurate, according to a new survey conducted by the CHIME Foundation.

Michigan Plans to Link State PDMP with Provider EHRs

The State of Michigan is directly adding the Michigan Automated Prescription System (MAPS) into the electronic health records (EHRs) and pharmacy management systems of hospitals, physician groups and pharmacies across the state.

Teladoc to Acquire Medical Consultation Company in $440M Deal

Telehealth company Teladoc has announced that it has acquired medical consultation firm Best Doctors for a deal totaling $440 million in cash and stock.

Study: Digital Health Coaching App Improves Weight Loss, Blood Pressure Management

A digital health app and 1-to-1 coaching platform can help patients lose weight and reduce blood pressure, according to a new study published in the June issue of the Journal of Medical Internet Research.

Rush University Launches Telemedicine Program for Movement Disorders Patients

Chicago-based Rush University Medical Center has launched a new telemedicine program for movement disorders patients.

MGMA Poll: Providers Not Yet Using Data from Patients’ Wearables

Just 6 percent of healthcare professional respondents indicated that their practices were currently using data from patients’ wearables, while 81 percent responded they were not doing so, according to a new survey from the Medical Group Management Association (MGMA).