Skip to content Skip to navigation

Survey: One-Third of Healthcare Providers Using Remote Patient Monitoring, Virtual Care

April 20, 2017
by Heather Landi
| Reprints

About three-fourths of healthcare providers have virtual care initiatives in place, and about a third are using remote patient monitoring to improve patient engagement and access to care and more of these programs are likely to come, according to a survey commissioned by KPMG LLP, the U.S. tax, audit and advisory firm.

"We are seeing a strategic shift in how providers are thinking about investment in digital health capabilities including virtual health platforms, enhanced portals and web interactions as well as scheduling and referral management tools to improve patient experience, increase access to care and provide continuity of care," Michael Beaty, a principal at KPMG's Healthcare & Life Sciences Practice, said.

Technology can remove the constraint of geography in healthcare, improving patient engagement, increasing convenience, and providing a higher quality treatment to remote areas. “Despite being used interchangeably, telemedicine connects the medical specialist-to-primary care or emergency department clinicians through technology. Telehealth connects clinicians directly with patients in their home, on mobile devices, or in community locations, such as retail pharmacies or employer health stations,” KPMG stated in a press release about the survey.

The survey was conducted by HIMSS Analytics and from Feb. 15 - March 17, 2017, 147 healthcare executives were polled about the state of adoption for virtual care services. The survey also explored the top challenges hospitals and healthcare systems face in digital health. Respondents were comprised of the C-suite, IT, and clinical leaders.

according to the survey, approximately 31 percent of healthcare organizations presently use video-based services and 34 percent offer remote patient monitoring. Expansion plans for these services could drive future use with another 44 percent seeing video-based services and 48 percent planning for remote patient monitoring, the survey found.

About half of providers said they had clinician-to-clinician consults or continuous monitoring through tele-stroke or tele-ICU offerings. The survey found some variance in the pace of adoption of Virtual Care, but three-quarters of providers have some form of telemedicine or telehealth offering but only a fraction call their program "advanced."

The survey found that healthcare organizations are adopting virtual care programs, but at widely varying rates.

Survey respondents were asked to classify the maturity of their virtual care initiatives. Forty-five percent said their organizations are just beginning with one or two pilot projects, while 29 percent categorized their initiatives as “early program investments with less than three FTE staff supporting the network for two-plus service lines across the organization.” Twenty-two percent of respondents said their organizations have a sustainable virtual care program with decentralized governance and service-line specific technologies, and 18 percent classified their virtual care initiatives as a sustainable virtual care program with central governance and standard clinical workflow, technology solution and performance measures (KPIs) reporting. Only 5 percent characterized their program as being advanced with central governance and standard clinical workflow, technology solution and KPI reporting, supporting greater than five service lines.

The survey respondents also identified a number of challenges in virtual care. About a quarter of survey respondents said "maintaining a sustainable business and/or financial model" was the biggest challenge, followed by adoption issues with clinicians (17 percent), defining a strategy to implement Virtual Care (12 percent), and regulatory compliance and risk/liability concerns (12 percent).

"The business case for implementing a Virtual Care program is improving as healthcare evolves toward value-based care incentives from limited fee-for-service reimbursements," Richard Bakalar, M.D., KPMG managing director and member of the firm's Global Healthcare Center of Excellence, said. "It's more efficient for high cost and limited clinical staff as well as other onsite resources, while making it more convenient and timely for patients to receive their care."

 

 

Get the latest information on Telemedicine and attend other valuable sessions at this two-day Summit providing healthcare leaders with educational content, insightful debate and dialogue on the future of healthcare and technology.

Learn More

Topics

News

VETS Act Introduced to Expand Veterans’ Access to Telehealth Services

U.S. Senators Joni Ernst (R-IA) and Mazie Hirono (D-HI), both members of the Senate Armed Services Committee, reintroduced this week the Veterans E-Health and Telemedicine Support Act of 2017 (VETS Act), bipartisan legislation that aims to expand telehealth services provided by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).

Mayo Clinic Makes Health Content Available via Epic’s Patient Apps

Rochester, Minn.-based Mayo Clinic is now offering its health information on demand via Epic patient-facing apps such as MyChart and MyChart Bedside.

Report: Cyber Attackers Using Simple Tactics, Tools to Target Healthcare, Other Industries

The number of reported breach incidents in healthcare grew by 22 percent in 2016 from 269 breach incidents in 2015 to 328 last year, according to Symantec’s 2017 Internet Security Threat Report (ISTR).

The Sequoia Project Touts Interoperability Growth in Fifth Year

The Sequoia Project is celebrating its fifth anniversary this month by announcing that its various interoperability initiatives have grown by health organization participants, by geographic reach, and by the sheer number of health records exchanged electronically.

Report: HHS to Open Healthcare Cybersecurity Center

HHS will be opening a Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center in which healthcare organizations and consumers can get educated about the risks of using mobile apps and data.

Survey: Two-Thirds of Healthcare Employees Share Confidential Data On Occasion

Seventy-two percent of employee say they would share sensitive, confidential or regulated company information under certain circumstances and 68 percent of healthcare employees report that they share confidential or regulated data on occasion, according to the Dell End-User Security Survey.