Skip to content Skip to navigation

mHealth Apps Linked to Well-Being

November 7, 2014
by Rajiv Leventhal
| Reprints

People are increasingly using mobile health technology to improve their well-being, according to new Gallup research.

About half of smartphone users have downloaded at least one app that is meant to support healthy living, and 19 percent of all adults have downloaded and routinely used at least one such app. This means that one out of every five people are regularly using mobile technology to improve their chances of a life well-lived. Among full-time workers, this percentage climbs to 23 percent, according to the researchers.

Out of 11 popular types of apps on the market, usage varies. Across all adults, the most common use is for calorie counting: 18 percent report having downloaded an app for that purpose. Of these, one-third -—or 6 percent—routinely use the app. Health recipes and food/exercise diaries are the next most common type of apps used.

Gallup and the Brooklyn,  N.Y.-based health and well-being improvement company Healthways define well-being based on five essential elements: purpose, social, financial, community and physical. Across the U.S., 28 percent of American adults are not thriving in any of the five elements, while just 7 percent are thriving in all five. But those who download and routinely use health-related apps do better in well-being— after controlling for all demographics and for previously existing chronic conditions, these regular users are thriving in at least three of the elements 33 percent of the time, compared with 27 percent among all others.

The researchers note that these results don't prove that using apps will lead to better well-being outcomes; adults with high well-being might be more predisposed to download and use health-related apps. But finding these results after controlling for all demographics and chronic conditions suggests that catalyzing use of health-related apps is a good way to increase well-being.

Read the source article at Gallup.Com



OSU Wexner Medical Center Receives AHIMA Grace Award

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center (OSUWMC) received the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) annual Grace Award in recognition of its leadership in health information management.

Kansas Health Information Network Expands its Network across State Lines

The Kansas Health Information Network (KHIN) has announced that it is expanding its horizons, and is now connected to Health Information Exchange Texas (HIETexas).

CMS Selects Vendor to Modernize Critical Identity Infrastructure

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) last week announced it had selected San Francisco-based vendor Okta to enhance the security of its information systems.

Mayo Clinic, ASU Partner for Medical Education, Healthcare Innovation

The Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University have announced a partnership centered on transforming medical education and healthcare in the U.S. through a variety of innovation efforts.

CMS Hospital Compare Website Updated with VA Data

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has announced the inclusion of Veterans Administration (VA) hospital performance data as part of the federal agency’s Hospital Compare website.

CMS Awards Funding to Special Innovation Projects

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has awarded 20, two-year Special Innovation Projects (SIPs) aimed at local efforts to deliver better care at lower cost.