Skip to content Skip to navigation

Study: CPOE Systems Effective in Reducing Medication Errors

February 25, 2013
by Gabriel Perna
| Reprints

According to a new research study, computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems are effective in reducing the frequency of medication errors in inpatient acute-care settings. The researchers conducted a systematic literature review and applied random-effects meta-analytic techniques to derive a summary estimate of the effect of CPOE on medication errors using data from the American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Survey and the Electronic Health Record Adoption Database.

The researchers, led by David C. Radley, Ph.D., who is a senior analyst and project director for The Commonwealth Fund Health System Scorecard and Research Project, a grant-funded position located at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, discovered that processing a prescription drug order through a CPOE system decreases the likelihood of error on that order by 48 percent.  “Given this effect size, and the degree of CPOE adoption and use in hospitals in 2008, we estimate a 12.5 percent reduction in medication errors, or ∼17.4 million medication errors averted in the USA in 1 year,” the authors wrote.

Overall, the researchers said that despite their findings, it’s unclear whether this translates into reduced harm for patients. Also, they mentioned that adoption in US hospitals remain modest. Still, they say “Current policies to increase CPOE adoption and use will likely prevent millions of additional medication errors each year.”

Topics

News

Insurer to Pay $2.2M HIPAA Settlement for Disclosure of Unsecured ePHI

MAPFRE Life Insurance Company of Puerto Rico has agreed to settle potential noncompliance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) Privacy and Security Rules by paying $2.2 million.

Avoidable Hospitalizations among LTC Residents Drops by 31 Percent

A data brief from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has revealed that avoidable hospitalizations among long-term care facility residents has dropped by about 31 percent since 2010.

Stanford Creates Center to Link Faculty, Digital Health Companies

The Stanford University School of Medicine has launched a center to support collaborations between Stanford faculty and Silicon Valley technology companies focusing on digital health tools.

CMS: 359K Clinicians Participating in Four Alternative Payment Models in 2017

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has announced that some 359,000 clinicians are confirmed to participate in four of CMS’s Alternative Payment Models (APMs) in 2017.

Mercy Named 2016 HIMSS Enterprise Davies Award Recipient

St. Louis-based Mercy, the fifth largest Catholic health care system in the nation operating hospitals in four states, was named a 2016 Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) Enterprise Davies Award recipient this month for achieving improvements in patient care through the use of health information technology.

Survey: Docs Want to Keep Pace with New Patient Demands, Technology

A recent survey of 500 physicians revealed that nearly 9 in 10 respondents ranked “achieving work-life balance” as their most, or second most-important resolution for 2017. Similarly, 69 percent ranked “staying current with technology” as their most, or second most-important resolution.