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Connecting Expectant Moms and Others with Trusted Content—and Gaining Patient Engagement

August 31, 2018
by Mark Hagland
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Leaders at South Shore Health System in Massachusetts invest in mobile app infrastructure to increase patient engagement

Can the implementation of mobile health applications improve patient outcomes and enhance patient engagement? The leaders at South Shore Health System (SSHS) have invested in the proposition that it can. That three-hospital integrated health system, located in South Weymouth, Massachusetts, had been facing the same types of challenges that other integrated health systems have long faced, in terms of consumer health content that was not optimally presented or shared with patients and families.

So, partnering with the Raleigh, N.C.-based MobileSmith, an “app-as-a-Service” company, South Shore leaders have been able to achieve more targeted, consistent messaging and care to all obstetrical patients, regardless of practice.

Now, instead of frustrating users with irrelevant notifications or pages of unnecessary content, expectant mothers can use the app to quickly connect to everything they need to know at each stage throughout their pregnancy.

Among the results SSHS leaders have documented include the following:

  • OB-Maternity HCAHPS (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems) survey scores have risen by 68 percent -- jumping SSHS from the 53rd percentile to 89th
  • The hospital’s Care Transitions ranking also improved by 40 percent (from 43rd percentile to 60th)
  • Nearly 50 percent of new moms have opted for the app over printed handouts
  • Beyond new referrals, SSHS saved $10,000-15,000 in printing costs alone last year, reducing wasted paper-based booklets still used by many OB/GYN practices
  • SSHS is about to roll out a new bariatrics app that will be used as part of their certification program

Recently, three leaders from South Shore Health System spoke with Healthcare Informatics Editor-in-Chief Mark Hagland about their initiative, and its results. Kim Dever, M.D. is the health system’s chair of obstetrics and gynecology, and president of its medical staff; Luke Poppish is executive director of obstetrical and gynecological services; and Faye Weir, Ph.D., is director of parent/child services for the organization. Below are excerpts from that interview.

Tell me about the origins of this initiative?

Kim Dever, M.D.: At South Shore Health System, patients were getting the bulk of their information through smartphones, and we thought, what better place for our information to go to them, than through the tool they use every day? So, Luke Poppish said, let’s develop an app for our pregnant patients. We wanted to get them information. So we created the South Shore Hospital Babies app… Paper information wasn’t being used or saved. And we also could save money on printing all those brochures, etc. They can time their contractions, they can register for classes. It’s really been a nice way to reach our target audience.

Luke Poppish: We also had a lot of moms coming from a variety of different private practices—five at that time—whose doctors delivered at South Shore. So, we were faced with five different ways of communicating, and sharing feedback. We were getting a lot of input that there was a lot of fragmented communication at the practices, about processes and procedures at the hospital when they would check in. So we wanted to achieve standardization of messages, of focused content, of referrals, etc.

Faye Weir, Ph.D.: It wasn’t a one-and-done. Given the vast amount of work that nurses do in terms of preparation for childbirth and delivery, breastfeeding, post-partum, etc., as Luke partnered to develop the app, we linked him into the shared governance professional practice model here at South Shore, which means that nurses are actively involved in decision-making; so Luke was able to partner with a number of the nurses doing the patient care, and collaborate. It’s been a very iterative process; the staff has been able to identify even other areas to work on, including first-year, second-year areas. So it’s been a very collaborative process.

What has the timeline been like around this initiative?

Weir: In the spring of 2016, we started investigating apps, evaluated them through the early summer, by mid-summer of 2016, we decided to go with MobileSmith—the longest period of time actually was developing and signing the contract—it was a new process for us. That was a two- or three-month process. By late October of 2016, we had a skeleton developed—with feedback from nurses, midwives, and obstetricians. And by the beginning of December, we had our first test app. We launched into the app stores by the end of December of 2016, started marketing it in February 2017. That’s when we started measuring our metrics. We circulated it once it got to the stores, to make sure we didn’t miss anything. Since March of 2017, we’ve probably gone through seven or eight iterations of the app. We’ve added content around transitions of care, breastfeeding and support for breastfeeding, modified some elements. And we’re planning to continue to produce a quarterly to biennial revision of the content, over time.

What have been the biggest challenges and learnings so far in this initiative?

Devers: The biggest has been getting the information to the providers so they could share it with their patients; that’s always a challenge. Next challenge, to get patients to sign up for it. And helping providers help get patients signed up. And then there’s the sustainability needs, once you get the initial group going.

Poppish: And I would say, feedback from the private practices. It was a little bit weird for some of the nurses who had been in practice for a long time not to have lots of pieces of paper—15 to 20 leaflets—to hand out to patients. At first, the practice managers were a little bit reticent. We haven’t yet gone 100-percent app yet. Patients who need any paper can be offered that.

Weir: It was communication, making sure the patients were aware at every contact point in the organization and in the offices, so that we could maximize communication. Having the nurses value this instead of handing out paper. And from time to time, we have to invigorate this. That involves shifting the culture from paper, to a new concept of mobile health.

Poppish: Because it’s free and there’s no protected health information—you simply enter a due date—family members would join in, extended family members would follow the pregnancy, after putting in the due date. And, around the process of taking the education out of the EHR [electronic health record] paperwork and putting it into the app, getting used to that shift—we’ve seen really good progress in that, too.

Weir: I underestimated the involvement that my entire division would want to have—pre-natal, post-natal, and then NICU, and then child development. I underestimated the scope that this particular app would take, well beyond the pregnancy period. That’s part of that ongoing adjustment that we’re making.

Devers: It is dynamic. In the past, if you printed something, you would have to change it entirely. And we found that mental health issues, substance abuse, in the post-delivery phase, those were areas we could add more information into.

And the informational content is private and it’s reliable, because it’s coming from your health system.

Weir: Yes. And as the app’s been built, these places in the app have direct links into it, and we can link them to ACOG [the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology], or do evidence-based breastfeeding information, and so on and so forth—so the patients are landing in the right place and accessing the right sources.

Devers: And we’re tracking we’re they’re going.

Poppish: Yes, with every internal page they hit on the app, we get a monthly report from MobileSmith. And we have a lot of… And we can determine how much and what type of information to add to pages. We get monthly usage data, page viewing data, MobileSmith does the development, and we agreed we would track metrics, for improvement on a quarterly basis. We’ve been tracking HCAHPS around transitions of care and post-partum, and likelihood to recommend. We thought this would have positive impact on.

Has it had a positive impact?

Poppish: Yes.

Devers: We definitely can attribute a drop in printing to this.

What would you say to health IT leaders, to clinicians, and to other hospital and health system leaders, about all of this?

Kim: You have to look at your patient and consider them your consiumer and consider where they get their information. I love that the information they’re accessing is information that we know is evidence-based. From the clinical side, the discussion is easy; we just need IT support for this, because there are costs.

Poppish: From an IT standpoint, we’ve learned to keep it as simple as possible. Having a dynamic development platform is important; we’ve changed it many times. It’s important for it to be easy to work with. We also were getting ready to implement Epic at the same time as we were launching this. IT asked whether we needed additional resources, and we said no, we can do this. And it doesn’t have any PHI or HIPAA in it; that would have added a year or longer to its development and implement. So I think IT leaders need to balance how much information they want from patients, what they need, and what is their true goal, and then figure out how many resources you need to support your goal. It helped a lot that we were pretty hands off with them, and that was very helpful.

Is there anything you’d like to add?

Poppish: We’ve had such a great success with SSH Babies that this April, we launched an SSH Bariatrics app with a few surgeons—it helps to prep people ot qualify for bariatric surgery. And we’ve had good results with that as well. Possibly soon a post-partum depression and mental health app. Possibly a NICU app. Everybody wants to get their information in; so when do we launch a new app?

Weir: It does provide dynamic and interactive connection to content and to providers.

Devers: And people like to see the doctors, and they like to interact, too, via video tools.

 

 


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N.Y. Hospital Conducts Digital Assessments of Patient Interactions

November 13, 2018
by David Raths, Contributing Editor
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Upstate University Hospital uses Vocera Rounds mobile app to gather data, provide feedback
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Physicians at Upstate University Hospital in Syracuse, N.Y., are using a mobile app to collect data about hospitalists’ behaviors during patient interactions in order to provide real-time feedback.

Amit Dhamoon, M.D., Ph.D., internist at Upstate University Hospital and associate professor of medicine at SUNY Upstate Medical University, said he was looking for a way to improve physician-patient communications.

“It is still unclear why some physicians really connect with patients and some just are not able to,” he said. “It is unclear why certain patients trust certain doctors more than others. We want to look at some basic behaviors.”

His team decided to do the digital assessment using a customized version of Vocera Rounds, a mobile application that enables clinicians to collaborate in responding to patient feedback and closing care gaps. “We needed a way to collect the data, relay it, and analyze it,” he said.

Fourth-year medical students who are going into internal medicine join the team of hospitalists on their rounds and serve as “silent shoppers,” Dhamoon said. They focus on the communication aspects of each interaction, and enter their observations into an iPad.  Residents and physicians also use the app to conduct a brief patient survey after the encounter. 

Among other things, they assess:

• how much time the provider was in the room;
• whether the provider introduced themselves;
• whether they sat down at eye level with patient; and
• At the end of conversation, did they ask if there were any questions?

Dhamoon said patients may pick up on body language or other things that physicians are not even cognizant of. “We are focusing on how to treat gall bladder disease or make their pneumonia better. We are focusing on the medicine,” he said. “We have to do that, but we also have to communicate what we are thinking.”

In an academic medical center, it is not unusual for teams of eight to nine doctors, residents and students enter a patient’s room. “Sometimes they don’t know what to do with their hands, so they stand with their arms crossed in front of them,” Dhamoon said. “For the patient, who is lying down with an ailment, it can almost feel like an inquisition.”

Dhamoon says hospital rooms are sometimes cramped and there is not a chair available. “I can say that it should be the gold standard that we are at eye level, so it doesn’t send a message to the patient that we have one foot out the door. But if we don’t have the basic tools in place, like a chair, then it is not going to work.”

Dhamoon and his colleagues are studying the effectiveness of this training approach and its impact on patient satisfaction measured by Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) surveys.  “My colleagues are incredible people. I want our patients to see how incredible they are. We get in our own way sometimes.”

 

 


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GetWellNetwork Acquires HealthLoop

November 9, 2018
by David Raths, Contributing Editor
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Company seeks to provide comprehensive digital patient and family engagement platform

GetWellNetwork, a Bethesda, Md.-based company offering a platform for improving patient engagement, has acquired Silicon Valley startup HealthLoop.

The acquisition expands 280-employee GetWellNetwork’s reach into nearly 700 healthcare providers. Mountain View-Calif.-based HealthLoop’s platform enables care teams to engage patients before and after admission through automated, daily check-ins. Customers include Advocate Aurora Health, UCSF Health and LifeBridge

GetWellNetwork said it is combining its nearly two decades of experience implementing patient engagement solutions with 30-employee HealthLoop’s expertise in mobile technologies and digital care management. The move is designed to catalyze growth in the ambulatory space and signals its plans for more investment in cross-continuum tools to connect patients, families and providers.

GetWellNetwork was named one of Healthcare Informatics’ “Up and Comer” companies back in 2014. In an interview then, CEO Michael O’Neil described how the company uses the TV set in a hospital room to enhance patient engagement. To deal with pain management, GetWellNetwork has a workflow called the pain assessment pathway. If a patient is on a morphine pill, the system interrupts the TV show every hour to ask the patient to rate their pain on a scale. "If I report a certain threshold or below, it is simply going to document that in Epic, Cerner or Allscripts," O'Neil said. "If I report a five or above, it will document but also, through a Vocera badge, signal a nurse to go to the room. That is one pathway we help deploy, where pain management is a service or quality metric that a particular organization is trying to move the needle on. We are working with healthcare systems with the courage to take the 'patient-centered mission' off the poster in their office and bring it to the point of care."

In a prepared statement about the most recent acquisition, O’Neil said:  “Adding HealthLoop to our portfolio advances our strategy to provide the most comprehensive, end-to-end digital patient and family engagement platform. The changing nature of the how and where care is delivered requires dynamic solutions to meet modern engagement challenges. With HealthLoop as part of the GetWell portfolio, we’re excited to help health care organizations rethink and accelerate their digital strategies.”

 

 

 

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Dr. Mark Smith’s Five Tasks for the Healthcare Sector

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Founding CEO of California Health Care Foundation challenges industry to allow laypeople to do some tasks now done by professionals
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A good keynote address gets us to challenge our assumptions and consider some new possibilities in our field, often bringing in ideas from other disciplines or markets. That is what Mark Smith, M.D., M.B.A. founding president and CEO of the California Health Care Foundation, did last week at the annual meeting of the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) in Washington, D.C.

Dr. Smith is a professor of clinical medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, and a visiting professor at the University of California, Berkeley. As a clinician, served on the front line of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in San Francisco. From 1996 to 2013, he led the California Health Care Foundation, where he helped build the organization into a leader in delivery system innovation, public reporting of care quality, and applications of new technology in healthcare. In his PCORI talk he laid out five tasks for the field, which I will paraphrase here:

1. Continue to work with providers and patients to develop robust clinically specific measures of quality.

2. Accelerate the integration and automation of quality measures into the work flow of care delivery as opposed to separate flow of funds, personnel and work.

3. Develop instruments to measure and improve self-care capability and work with industry on enabling technology that would allow laypeople to do tasks now done by professionals.

4. Think about non-creepy ways to use social media, search, shopping and other non-health data to inform care of patients.

5. Develop, promote and deploy nimble, adaptive research methodologies.

I want to touch on a few of these in detail because I think he made interesting points, some of which are counter-intuitive or go against the grain of current thinking. For instance, Task No. 1 involves quality measures, and Smith acknowledged that there are legitimate complaints from clinicians about the terrible burden in our current system of measurement. “But the answer to that is not a search for five magic measures” useful in all settings, he said. Smith added that the call for fewer measures is a false path.

The current measures are imprecise and often not compelling to patients and professionals, he stressed. The key is to develop measures that are relevant to patients and clinically significant. “We have all sorts of things important to hospitals, doctors and CFOs and CMOs,” he said. “We are just now learning how to create robust measures that are important to patients. I believe those will only be compelling to patients and their doctors if they are clinically specific. When I hear people say we need fewer, better measures, I say no, we need more better measures.”

Smith went into a few reasons why measurement is so challenging in healthcare. “Our IT systems are so primitive that the burden of collection, analysis, and reporting is substantial,” he said. “The answer is more clinically specific measures with greater integration into workflow.” In no other sector of the economy, he pointed out, are the systems for monitoring the quality of the process different from the established and funded system to do the process itself. “We have to Integrate the process of measuring quality and collecting information from patients with the view toward the ergonomic and economic integration into the work flow,” he said.

Smith turned to the concept of patient engagement, noting that everyone has a different definition. “In the early part of 21st century, patients should be engaged in the co-production of healthcare services. It is an extreme notion, but I have been known for being extreme sometimes,” he said.

In fact, Smith focused a good deal of his talk on the idea of co-production. He pointed to the fact that other industries have taken advantage of technology to allow customers to co-produce a service. For instance, people book their own travel now instead of using a travel agent; they use an ATM or bank online instead of getting money from a teller. “Those industries have economic incentive to involve us in the transaction that used to be one way from the professional to us,” he said.

Smith stressed healthcare could do more of that, citing examples such as patients in Great Britain taking their own blood pressure and managing hypertension with medications based on the results. Or patients being trained to test coagulation. Some patient cohorts are doing self-dialysis.

“We have a system that does not take advantage of modern IT,” he added, “because our payment system is based on early 20th century notion of healthcare and how it should be delivered. The only way the practitioner gets paid is if you go somewhere to get information.”

Health systems are starting to move toward involving patients in scheduling decision making, and reporting outcomes. The Open Notes movement is a big improvement in the co-production of information about patient health, but clearly Smith is envisioning more revolutionary changes.

Perhaps the most controversial topic he touched on was No. 4, finding non-creepy ways to use social media, search, shopping and other non-health data to inform care of patients. He asked the audience to imagine clinicians having access to what Google Amazon, and Facebook know about you. “I know that is creepy,” he stressed. “I get there are privacy concerns. We need to think of non-creepy ways to do it. Social media is like nuclear energy,” he added. “It can be used for good or ill. We need to try to integrate that profound deep knowledge about you into the management of your care.”

How you respond to that suggestion may reflect in part which generation you come from. Personally, I recoil from the idea of my primary care doctor reviewing my social media streams or my shopping bill from Whole Foods. But Smith said the search is for a non-creepy way to do that, so I will withhold judgement until I hear an idea that doesn’t sound creepy or Big Brother-ish to me.

But overall, Smith left the PCORI audience with a lot of ideas to consider, and he applauded PCORI researchers for “trying to figure out what is important to patients and get the right instruments to measure it.”

PCORI, he said, “is on the cutting edge of the most important thing we can do: spend time and effort and money on things that are important to patients rather than to professionals. We are just at the beginning of that process.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

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