CMS’ MSSP Proposed Changes Slammed by Leading ACO Organization | Healthcare Informatics Magazine | Health IT | Information Technology Skip to content Skip to navigation

CMS’ MSSP Proposed Changes Slammed by Leading ACO Organization

August 10, 2018
by Rajiv Leventhal
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Industry stakeholders fear that ACOs will drop out, while CMS doesn’t seem to mind if upside-only ACOs that are costing the government money leave the program if they aren’t willing to take on more risk

The National Association of ACOs (NAACOS) called CMS’ (the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services) proposals to redo the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) “misguided,” noting that the changes, if finalized, “will upend the ACO movement by creating havoc with a significant overhaul introducing many untested and troubling policies.”

Late yesterday evening, CMS proposed a rule that included major changes to the existing MSSP ACO (accountable care organization) program. As Healthcare Informatics reported last night, referred to as “Pathways to Success,” CMS’ proposal, which has been expected for a few months, looks to redesign the program’s participation options by removing the traditional three tracks in the MSSP model and replacing them with two tracks that eligible ACOs would enter into for an agreement period of no less than five years: the BASIC track and the ENHANCED track.

Much of the discussion following the rule’s release will likely center around the BASIC track, which essentially limits ACOs to stay in “upside-only” risk models for just two years, compared to the existing allowance of six years. What’s more, those ACOs in an MSSP Track 1 upside-only model would only be able to get 25 percent of any savings they take in, compared to 50 percent, which is the current max.

When ACOs are in a one-sided risk model, they do not share losses with the government when they overspend past their benchmarks, but they do share in the gains. As such, in these one-sided risk models, CMS is on the hook for any losses all on its own.

Indeed, CMS has a clear goal to move ACOs more quickly into two-sided-risk models as the agency has noted that upside-only ACOs are not reducing costs and are costing Medicare money. “We project these changes will result in $2.24 billion in savings to Medicare program over next 10 years,” CMS Administrator Seema Verma stated yesterday.

Stakeholders Show Concern

As expected, NAACOS—a coalition whose members include more than 300 ACOs—had plenty of gripes with CMS’ proposals. Previously, following a survey of its members, NAACOS urged CMS to refrain from mandating ACOs to assume more risk. The organization, earlier this year, specifically reached out to Track 1 ACOs that were about to enter the final agreement period in 2019 before moving into two-sided risk models. The results of their survey showed that 71 percent of ACO respondents indicated they would likely leave the MSSP as a result of having to assume risk.

In a statement released last night, NAACOS President and CEO Clif Gaus noted, “The administration’s proposed changes to the ACO program will halt transformation to a higher quality, more affordable, patient-centered healthcare industry, stunting efforts to improve and coordinate care for millions of Medicare beneficiaries.”

According to Gaus, “The downside financial risk for patient care would be on top of the significant financial investments ACOs already make, jeopardizing years of effort and investment to improve care coordination and slow cost growth.” He continued, “CMS discusses creating stability for ACOs by moving to five-year agreements, but they are pulling the rug out from ACOs by redoing the program in a short timeframe with untested and troubling polices.”

In the proposal, CMS itself is predicting that more than 100 of the 561 MSSP ACOs will drop out of the program in the next 10 years as a result of this rule. But Gaus said that the number of ACOs who will leave will be far greater than that, referencing NAACOS’ survey from earlier this year. “Given the proposals put forth today, 70 percent could be an underestimate, with even more ACOs leaving the program,” he said.

“It’s naïve to think that ACOs that aren’t ready can be forced to take on risk, given that the program is voluntary. The more likely outcome will be that many ACOs quit the program, divest their care coordination resources and return to payment models that emphasize volume over value,” Gaus said. “This would be a significant setback for Medicare payment reform efforts and would undermine implementation of the overwhelmingly bipartisan Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA), which is designed to move providers into alternative payment models such as ACOs,” he added.

CMS, however, doesn’t seem to have a problem if upside-only ACOs that are costing the government money leave the program if they aren’t willing to take on more risk. Verma said yesterday on a press call that “[Upside-only] ACOs have no incentive, at all, to reduce healthcare costs while improving outcomes, as they were intended.”

On the contrary, NAACOS believes that “The best scientific evidence shows that the Medicare Track 1 ACOs overall are returning millions of dollars of savings to Medicare and improving the quality of care for millions of beneficiaries. To shrink and disable this leading alternative payment model in its early stages defies logic.”

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