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Report: More than 3M Patient Records Breached in Second Quarter of 2018

August 8, 2018
by Heather Landi
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More than 3.14 million patient records were breached in 142 disclosed health data breach incidents during a three-month span from April to June 2018, according to new data released in the Protenus Breach Barometer.

Published by Protenus, a cybersecurity software company that issues a Breach Barometer report each month, the latest data showed that in the second quarter of 2018 the number of affected patient records almost tripled from those reported in the first quarter of this year (1.13 million patient records).

Protenus and DataBreaches.net compiled the report using health data breaches reported to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) or to the media. The data found that there were several large data breach incidents during the second quarter, including a theft incident in April involving a Sacramento-based office of the Department of Developmental Services, affecting 582,000 patient records, and a hacking incident at a healthcare provider in May that impacted 566,000 patient records.

For incidents disclosed to the HHS or the media, insiders were responsible for 30.9 percent of the total number of breaches in Q2 2018 (44 incidents). Details were disclosed for 27 of those incidents, affecting 421,180 patient records (13.4 percent of total breached patient records).

The report notes an interesting trend with regard to insider breach incidents. In Q2 2018, 29.7 percent of privacy violations were repeat offenders. “This evidence indicates health systems accumulate risk that compounds over time if proper reporting and education do not occur. On average, if an individual healthcare employee breaches patient privacy once, there is a greater than 30 percent chance that they will do so again in three months’ time, and a greater than 66 percent chance they will do so again in a years’ time,” the report states.

The report authors note, “In other words, even minor privacy violations that are not promptly detected and mitigated, have the potential to compound risk over time.”

The Breach Barometer report data also shows that each hospital investigator is responsible for monitoring the electronic access of an average of 4,000 active EHR users in Q2 2018, underscoring that manual audit processes, like ad-hoc or random audits, are insufficient to monitor such a large population, each of whom accesses multiple medical records per day.

Nine out of 1,000 employees breach patient privacy, and family member snooping is the most common insider-threat violation (71.4 percent of violations), the Protenus data found.

Protenus data estimated that on average, 9.21 healthcare employees breach patient privacy per every 1,000 employees. This increase, from what was reported in Q1 2018, is due to healthcare privacy teams better leveraging advanced analytics, and proactively detecting more incidents, according to the report.

There were 25 publicly disclosed incidents that involved insider-error between April and June 2018. Details were disclosed for 14 of these incidents, affecting 343,036 patient records. In contrast, 18 incidents involved insider-wrongdoing, with data disclosed for 13 of these incidents. There was a substantial increase of breached patient records as a result of insider-wrongdoing.  In Q1 2018, there were only 4,597 affected patient records, while in Q2 2018, there were 70,562 affected patient records.

Looking at external threats, hacking continues to threaten healthcare organizations in 2018, with an increase in incidents in the second quarter. Between January and March, there were 30 hacking incidents, however, between April and June 2018 there have been a total of 52 incidents (36.6 percent of all Q2 2018 publicly disclosed incidents). Details were disclosed for 44 of those incidents, which affected 2 million patient records.

Of the 143 disclosed health data breaches that occurred between April and June 2018, 99 of them (76 percent of total incidents) were disclosed by a healthcare provider, 15 were disclosed by a health plan, 18 were disclosed by a business associate or third-party vendor, and ten were disclosed by businesses or other organizations.

Even though most healthcare organizations have already switched over to digitized patient records, 23 breach incidents still involved paper records.

The Protenus data also reported that, of the 142 health data breaches for which data was disclosed, it took an average of 204 days from when the breach occurred to when it was discovered. The median discovery time was 18 days. There was a wide variety in the data, with the shortest discovery time of one day and the longest of 1,587 days (4.35 years).

In conclusion, the Protenus report notes that the average cost per breached record has increased 6.4 percent ($408 per record) over last year. “Healthcare organizations must remain vigilant, looking for best practices in healthcare privacy that will allow them to audit every access to their patient data. Full visibility into how their data is being accessed and used will help organizations secure patient trust while preventing data breaches from having costly consequences for their organization,” the report states.

 

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Report: More than 3M Patient Records Breached in Second Quarter of 2018

More than 3.14 million patient records were breached in 142 disclosed health data breach incidents during a three-month span from April to June 2018, according to new data released in the Protenus Breach Barometer.