Skip to content Skip to navigation

Report: Consumer Self-Monitoring Will Drive Wireless Health

May 23, 2012
by Gabriel Perna
| Reprints

A recent report from Englewood, Colo.-based research firm, IMS Research, is predicting that medical devices utilized by the consumer to self-monitor their health, rather than those used in managed telehealth systems, will be the biggest opportunity for wireless technologies in healthcare over the next five years. In the report, “Wireless Opportunities in Health and Wellness Monitoring – 2012 Edition,” IMS Research forecasts that more than 50 million wireless health monitoring devices will ship for consumer monitoring applications during the next five years, with a smaller number being used in managed telehealth systems.

According to the IMS report, medical devices bought by the consumer to self-monitor their health will account for more than 80 percent of all wireless-enabled consumer medical devices in 2016. The researchers say the demand for consumers to self-monitor their health is growing much faster than the market for telehealth implementation. The report states consumers will want to be able to monitor and manage their own health at home, even if they don’t belong to a healthcare systems that is adapted for this. The researchers expect a proportion of wireless devices used in managed telehealth programs to increase from five percent in 2011, to 20 percent in 2016.

“Due to the relatively slow deployment of managed telehealth systems, which is in part due to a reluctance from health providers to move past trials, issues with reimbursement, and stringent regulations related to the use and storage of medical data, medical devices used by the consumer to independently monitor their health will provide the biggest uptake of wireless technology in consumer health devices over the next five years,” Lisa Arrowsmith, senior analyst at IMS Research, said in a statement.

Smartphones and other personal mobile devices are one of the main drivers as to why the consumer health monitoring device market will grow, the research report states. According to IMS, there is a wealth of mobile health apps, allowing users to transfer readings from a medical device, which can then be stored and displayed on the device, or uploaded to a cloud-based system. This is possible, the researchers say, by buying independent devices from companies such as A&D Medical which utilize wireless technologies such as ANT+ or Bluetooth. Measurements from these devices can be viewed and stored locally, on devices such as smart phones, or uploaded to independent cloud-based systems.

 “Many consumers already utilize smartphone apps to track their own health and fitness results, with devices such as activity monitors and heart-rate monitors. Now, there is increasing availability of health-related peripheral devices such as blood pressure monitors to track and upload information in real time via a wireless or wired connection to devices such as smartphones and tablets,” Arrowsmith says.

The report looks at 10 connectivity technologies in five consumer health monitoring devices, five types of dedicated health hub (with addition segmentation between managed telehealth devices and consumer medical devices), and five sports and fitness monitoring devices.

Topics

News

VETS Act Introduced to Expand Veterans’ Access to Telehealth Services

U.S. Senators Joni Ernst (R-IA) and Mazie Hirono (D-HI), both members of the Senate Armed Services Committee, reintroduced this week the Veterans E-Health and Telemedicine Support Act of 2017 (VETS Act), bipartisan legislation that aims to expand telehealth services provided by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).

Mayo Clinic Makes Health Content Available via Epic’s Patient Apps

Rochester, Minn.-based Mayo Clinic is now offering its health information on demand via Epic patient-facing apps such as MyChart and MyChart Bedside.

Report: Cyber Attackers Using Simple Tactics, Tools to Target Healthcare, Other Industries

The number of reported breach incidents in healthcare grew by 22 percent in 2016 from 269 breach incidents in 2015 to 328 last year, according to Symantec’s 2017 Internet Security Threat Report (ISTR).

The Sequoia Project Touts Interoperability Growth in Fifth Year

The Sequoia Project is celebrating its fifth anniversary this month by announcing that its various interoperability initiatives have grown by health organization participants, by geographic reach, and by the sheer number of health records exchanged electronically.

Report: HHS to Open Healthcare Cybersecurity Center

HHS will be opening a Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center in which healthcare organizations and consumers can get educated about the risks of using mobile apps and data.

Survey: Two-Thirds of Healthcare Employees Share Confidential Data On Occasion

Seventy-two percent of employee say they would share sensitive, confidential or regulated company information under certain circumstances and 68 percent of healthcare employees report that they share confidential or regulated data on occasion, according to the Dell End-User Security Survey.