UC Riverside Launches Telemedicine Pilot Project to Treat MS Patients | Healthcare Informatics Magazine | Health IT | Information Technology Skip to content Skip to navigation

UC Riverside Launches Telemedicine Pilot Project to Treat MS Patients

March 16, 2017
by Heather Landi
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Researchers at the School of Medicine at the University of California, Riverside have received a grant from Genetech, a biotechnology company, to develop and pilot-test a new home-based telemedicine program geared toward treating multiple sclerosis (MS) patients.

According to a press release from UC Riverside, Elizabeth Morrison-Banks, M.D., a health sciences clinical professor who studies MS, is leading the one-year project, titled “Clinicians’ Online Neurology Network Empowering Communities through Telemedicine – Multiple Sclerosis (CONNECT-MS).” The pilot program aims to determine whether virtual visits are equivalent to in-person appointments for people with MS.

MS clinicians face continued challenges in optimizing neurological care, especially for people with advanced MS living in medically underserved communities.  Because of insurmountable geographical and physical challenges, patients cannot always travel to neurology office appointments, according to the UC Riverside press release. Morrison-Bank and her research team aim to examine whether telemedicine – the use of telecommunication and information technology to provide clinical health care from a distance –can be effectively used to address this problem.

MS is an autoimmune disease of the brain and spinal cord, impacting about 2.3 million people worldwide (400,000 in the United States). Early disease-modifying therapy has been found to slow the progression of this unpredictable disease and lessen long-term disability, according to the UC Riverside press release.

The pilot project builds off an earlier telemedicine program Morrison-Banks and her research team conducted in collaboration with the Landon Pediatric Foundation for MS care funded by a previous Genentech research grant.

In this current pilot, Morrison-Banks said her research group will randomly assign participating adults with MS to an intervention group that will receive telemedicine intervention versus a control group that will be offered the usual care. For the intervention group, a nurse practitioner will visit patients in their homes, review the history and perform a neurological examination in collaboration with a neuro-immunologist at UC Riverside who will participate through a telemedicine connection.

The CONNECT-MS project’s nurse practitioner will visit each patient at home within three to four weeks after study enrollment to coordinate a HIPAA-protected telemedicine visit with Morrison-Banks. Together, the nurse practitioner and neuro-immunologist will conduct an intake visit, reviewing the patient’s history, performing a neurological examination and going over laboratory results and neuro-imaging before discussing decisions about work-up and management with the patient and family.

The research group will compare the intervention versus control groups for a number of variables, including quality of life, pain levels, fatigue, visual impairment, and mental health.

“The goal is to determine whether the home telemedicine approach works as well as usual care—that is, office visits with the neuro-immunologist,” Morrison-Banks said. “This is a pilot study and it may not be able to show whether MS telemedicine in patients’ homes is better than usual care, but if it appears to be equivalent – and if patients and families like it better because of its convenience and comfort – then the pilot study will provide useful preliminary data to guide larger research studies in the future.”

“Tele-neurology” is now a popular approach for stroke care because it allows rural communities rapid access to a qualified neurologist. Morrison-Banks said that telemedicine is newer in MS care and the focus is different from acute stroke care. People living with MS in rural areas can access a fellowship-trained MS specialist through telemedicine in a way that may never be possible for them if they had to travel long distances to get to the neuro-immunologist’s office, according to the press release.

“People with advanced MS face additional barriers to traveling to an MS center, even if it is located nearby, because if they have a lot of disability, over time it tends to become increasingly difficult for them to leave their homes,” she said. “So if we can bring the ‘medical home’ into people’s actual homes, we can meet multiple needs at the same time while allowing a safe and comfortable environment for the medical visit.”

She noted that caveats include the challenges of implementing any new technological solution.

“Some people may miss the face-to-face experience with the MS specialist,” she said. “In our current telemedicine clinic for teens with MS, as one might expect, the teens adapt to the technology without missing a beat.  I think these young people are going to lead the way for the rest of us in blending technological solutions into our everyday lives.”

 

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